Hart & Soul

08 Jul 2019 930 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image It's Monday

It's Monday

 

Dare to do the impossible!

(It's impossible for an elephant to look at you straight on with both eyes, we were told.

So the sculptor, Bernini, anthropomorphized this one in 1667, in Rome, Italy)

 

 

 

It's Monday

 

Dare to do the impossible!

(It's impossible for an elephant to look at you straight on with both eyes, we were told.

So the sculptor, Bernini, anthropomorphized this one in 1667, in Rome, Italy)

 

 

 

comments (23)

i did not know that, Ginnie. and it is unusual for me to see elephant sculptures, especially outside Thailand.
Ginnie Hart: It was news to me, too, Ayush, but when I look at this statue, it does seem weird to see the eyes looking at me!
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 8 Jul 2019, 02:09
That is a verry bent trunk, Ginnie!
Ginnie Hart: I know, Ray. Totally forget about the eyes, right?!
  • Steven
  • Chicagoland
  • 8 Jul 2019, 03:15
Not sure I would have caught this unless you said something. Great clarity and light!
Ginnie Hart: Me neither, Steven. Thank you.
Jolie sculpture mais il a une drôle de trompe.
Ginnie Hart: It has a very weird trunk, Martine, indeed.
Amazing... especially for the time! A lovely presentation, Ginnie!
Ginnie Hart: I know, Elizabeth! Thank you.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 8 Jul 2019, 05:42
Very interesting Ginnie. And until now I had no idea an elephant can't stare at us with both eyes..
Ginnie Hart: It was news to me, too, Chris. Astrid has just now been staring at elephants on Google and it does appear that their eyeballs are angled out to either side when they're facing you. Most interesting, indeed.
Magnifique travail de sculpture , pas courant du tout mais c'est beau !
Ginnie Hart: Leave it to the Italians, Merci, Claudine, right?!
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 8 Jul 2019, 06:28
It's almost that it has human eyes. It was the guide that told us and we were all surprised by this information, Ginnie. What a wonderful close-up. The artist also took some "freedom in design" with the trunk is my guess.
Ginnie Hart: That trunk actually amazes me more than the eyes, Astrid. HA!
There is a fountain in Chambéry in Savoie that is carved with 4 elephants of which only the head and chest can be seen. We call it the "4 without ass" fountain. Perhaps it is the same sculptor who made the statues..... Nice picture Ginnie
Ginnie Hart: That would be so interesting to see, Marie, especially if it IS by the same sculptor. Merci.
  • jpla
  • Anjou
  • 8 Jul 2019, 06:59
magnifique
JP
Ginnie Hart: Merci, JP.
Superbe cette sculpture extrêmement réaliste.
Bonne journée Ginnie
Ginnie Hart: Merci, Pascale.
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 8 Jul 2019, 07:37
Ginnie Hart: Unnerving, indeed, Alan. I totally agree. A friend just added this info to my FB post:

Elephant eyes are about 3.8 cm (1.5 in.) in diameter and their vision is moderate or we can say they have poor eyesight with a range of only 25 ft. This is slightly improved in forest shade. Elephants traverse forests, savannas, and grasslands, primarily orienting with the trunk, as opposed to sight. Ex: There have been documented occurrences of elephant herds being led by a blind member. The complete lack of vision did not hinder the blind member’s ability to fulfill its leadership role.Elephants have long eyelashes to help avert blowing sand, dirt, and debris from the eyes.

In addition to the upper and lower eyelids, elephants have a “third eyelid” which moves vertically across the eye. These eyelids function to protect the eye when feeding, bathing, and dusting (cooling down).

Some elephants develop a white ring that encircles the iris as they mature. This ring is similar to an age-ring that may develop in humans (as they age) called arcus lipoides, and does not affect vision.

The eyes of an elephant are located on the sides of the head and therefore provide better peripheral vision (angle of vision extending from the sides to the rear), rather than binocular vision (eyes located on the front of the face, in which fields of vision overlap, creating depth perception).
That is one very odd elephant Ginnie
Ginnie Hart: In almost every way, Bill! smile
that's a fine bit of rock n' roll trivia there!
and a beautiful picture!
Ginnie Hart: It's downright weird to me, Elaine, but thanks. smile
  • Chad
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 8 Jul 2019, 08:38
Oh yes I can see what he has done Ginnie, with my two eyes.
Ginnie Hart: HAHAHA! I really love your sense and sensibility, Chad. smile
Cos they're herbivores and they need a wider area of field of view to see their predators, right?

But why not? If Dumbo can fly, this little chap can have straight eyes. wink
Ginnie Hart: HA! I'm sure you're right, LC. And if Dumbo can fly, the possibilities are endless!
I'd never thought about Elephants eyes in that way. It is the length of its trunk I find rather strange.
Ginnie Hart: I totally agree with you on both, Brian!
Artistic license!
Ginnie Hart: Exactly!
What a beautiful emotional appeal this one has! Friendship
Ginnie Hart: When you want to be friends with an elephant! smile
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 8 Jul 2019, 14:42
Binocular vision - the eyes in front of the head (like this elephant) and is the type for most predators in the animal world. The field of vision is about 180°, but depth of recognition is very important.

Monocular vision - eyes at the side of the head and actually used separately. It covers a wide angle - up to 180° on each side. Mostly with prey animals, which needs to cover the field all around them. The drawback is that the left and right views only converges some distance in front of the animal - that leaves a blind area. Once you know this, you will understand why an animal, like a giraffe, turns its head to follow you out in the bush. The giraffe is the most noticeable, since its blind spot is the biggest.

Telescopic vision is mostly for the birds. Their eyes are not as spherical as mammals, more flat. It increases the depth of vision. Of course there are variations. Raptors have the eyes to the front and most other birds more to the side.

So, knowing all of this, I wondered why Bemini wanted the elephant to have binocular vision. Your website is not very clear, but it seems to me he thought the elephant will look more friendly.

Hah, you got me going here.
Ginnie Hart: I love when you get going, Louis. HA! Thanks for all the helpful info.
  • willy
  • BelgiĆ«
  • 8 Jul 2019, 14:47
I would not have immediately thought of Bernini..Ginnie

have a nice day
Ginnie Hart: Surprises everywhere on this Monday, then, Willy. smile
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
  • 9 Jul 2019, 02:25
an extraordinary scene. my favorite part is the tip of the trunk.
Ginnie Hart: To be honest, Sherri, the entire truck kinda scares me. grin
  • CherryPie
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 10 Jul 2019, 00:31
An interesting sculpture.
Ginnie Hart: Indeed, Cherry.

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon PowerShot SX50 HS
exposure mode full manual
shutterspeed 1/1600s
aperture f/8.0
sensitivity ISO200
focal length 38.7mm
Happy Birthday to AstridHappy Birthday t...
A Mid-Week BreakA Mid-Week Break
Boat FridayBoat Friday

Warning