Hart & Soul

30 May 2011 529 views
 
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photoblog image Youth in Asia

Youth in Asia

 

I mean euthanasia, of course, which is the topic of my Vision & Verb post today.

 

Joekie

9 March 1957 - 15 May 2011


She was euthanised at the age of 54 here in The Netherlands

after a short bout with incurable cancer.

 

[Image from The Three Mermaids statue in Drøbak, Norway.]

 


Youth in Asia

 

I mean euthanasia, of course, which is the topic of my Vision & Verb post today.

 

Joekie

9 March 1957 - 15 May 2011


She was euthanised at the age of 54 here in The Netherlands

after a short bout with incurable cancer.

 

[Image from The Three Mermaids statue in Drøbak, Norway.]

 


comments (36)

  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 30 May 2011, 01:03
This is some thing down here that is not legal,but is always being call for
Ginnie Hart: Everywhere, I think, Vintage. When it IS legal, albeit with checks and balances, it feels totally astonishing.
  • Ray
  • Hong Kong
  • 30 May 2011, 01:24
From this angle I cannot tell if there is anguish or yearning...perhaps euthanasia is a little perplexing, too, Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: I'm sure it's both, Ray...a time of anguish and yearning. And very perplexing but 'normal'?
What a beautiful portrait!
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, KWB. smile
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 30 May 2011, 04:07
A perfect image for the subject.
It looks like the mermaid is looking at the horizon into a new life, without pain and grieve.......
I have know Joekie for many years, she deserved to die in dignity and merciful.
Ginnie Hart: I know you will always live with the beautiful memory of Joekie, MLMA, grateful that her suffering was ended mercifully. I will never forget this experience. Our tears of mourning and gratitude say it all.
  • Kala
  • United States
  • 30 May 2011, 05:27
A very touchy subject here in the US. I wish our laws were like yours.
Ginnie Hart: I still can't believe Dr. Jack Kevorkian was in prison for 8 years because of his relentless work on this issue, Kala. I know it's a very touchy subject for many, not only in America. I wish there were easy answers....
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 30 May 2011, 05:41
'euthanasia' and particularly the sentence "She was euthanised" are horrible words in my ears, esp. in German ears (you know our bad NS- history!) - I know in NL it is allowed to finish the life on condition that life may be unbearable - I have my inner problems in this case ...I want to read your V &V post, but is not possible yet.
Ginnie Hart: My V&V post, dear Philine, is only a recounting of this very personal story for Astrid and me, and is not really meant for discussion or debate. I know there are unanswered questions for many re: this issue. It's a hard one. In V&V I mention Dr. Jack Kevorkian's relenless struggle to legalize euthanasia in America. The documentary film done on his life was an eye-opener for me when I saw it last year in America (played by Al Pacino: "You Don't Know Jack"). It's definitely not an easy subject...but I often wonder why? We take care of the animal kingdom mercifully (when our pets are dying especially) but switch gears when it comes to people.... Are we afraid we're playing God??
  • Mroy
  • USA
  • 30 May 2011, 06:25
I don't think it's legal here in CA. But that's a very hot topic.
Ginnie Hart: It's not legal in America, Maria. That's why Dr. Kevorkian was in prison for 8 years! It really is a hot topic but I sometimes wonder why?!
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 30 May 2011, 06:33
I now could read your post (after it appeared on the screen), your very personal post, and I have compassion with the situation of Joekie and with your feelings - yes, here is not the place to discuss this very complex- touchy topic. Only two points: My Dutch friend Wilma is still suffering from the 'euthanasia' her mother experienced some years ago - here in our country there are some ways to accompany persons on their way to death and to ease their suffering in a loving way, i.e. the palliative medicine and the hospice movement coming from England ...the main question is and remains: what is life, what does mean worth living?
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, Philine, for reading my post. It's such a difficult subject, I know. With Joekie, I just cried with Astrid. It was the sorrow of a life that came so quickly to an end, but we were glad her suffereing was ended and not prolonged. Astrid says it's very complicated legally to get the paperwork done for euthanasia here in The Netherlands. There are lots of checks and balances. In the movie about Dr. Kevorkian, they talked about the patients who were refused, especially those who were depressed but were not incurable. You are right about the final question: what is life?
Un buen retrato, me gusta la edición. Supongo que ella sufriendo pudo elegir su destino final.

Un buen disparo.

Salduos
Ginnie Hart: Gracias, Bernardo. In the end she chose to live!
A superb expression of suffering! Yet I know it's a bit paradoxical as reflection! A touchy subject! Yet with the increased life expectancy and medical advances! The disease can it not surprise us and prolong suffering collateral?
Ginnie Hart: Such a complex issue, Mathilde, but in the end, she was able to choose life and I applaud her. Merci.
  • Elaine-
  • Canada
  • 30 May 2011, 06:44
i'm all for euthanasia, will go read your posty, love this picture, very active quality to the statue
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, Elaine, as always!
nicely composed which is adding to the feel!
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Joshi.
Ho yes ! Hello Ginnie, she shouts, she has to think of me, I think, kiss kiss, good day
Ginnie Hart: She yearns for life, Pierrot. Merci.
I have read your V&V Ginnie and was moved by it
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, dear Bill.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 30 May 2011, 08:51
This looks like one of those idealised statues from east Europe at first glance Ginnie. You can't get euthanised here in the UK but you can always take a short trip to Switzerland: as somebody I once knew did
Ginnie Hart: This issue coming to light for us recently now makes me wonder what countries do allow it legally, Chris. According to this following artcle, only The Netherlands and Belgium legally allow it. A handful of others allow assisted suicide. Apparently Switzerland does not punish doctors who perform it.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/In_what_countries_is_euthanasia_legal
nice contrast in this shot
Ginnie Hart: Bedankt, Chantal.
  • Aussie
  • Australia
  • 30 May 2011, 09:32
great close up
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Aussie.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 30 May 2011, 10:44
A picture worthy of the plight. Longer comment on V&V.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you and thank you, Louis!
  • John Prior
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 30 May 2011, 11:43
Gazing into eternity.
Ginnie Hart: Yes, John...into the life beyond!
One of the most thoughtful postings I have seen from you Ginnie when tied in with the V.& V.article of yours. It is a very sad story and I'm sure Astrid will be upset. We none of us really know how we would feel about Euthanasia unless, or until, the tragedy leading to the possibility of it strikes ones self or near to home, at best we hope it never will.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, dear Brian. You are so right. We really can't know what we would do until we're in the situation!
Simply a perfect timeless image Ginnie to mark this moment in time. All who experience deeply compassionate choices such as this are changed and expand on a soul level. Sending you & Astrid long hugs.
Ginnie Hart: You have said this so perfectly, Jacquelyn. YOU are compassionate. Thank you.
Such a beautiful and poetic image to accompany such a heartbreaking and thoughtful topic, Ginnie. This image looking toward the light, looking for hope, perhaps?

I too am a firm believer in choice, Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: I had initially chosen another image, Alex...tulips from a gravesite in Drøbak. But the more I looked at this face, the more it touched me as appropriate for this post. Thank you for your kind and compassionate words. We're on the same page!
  • Frida
  • Sweden
  • 30 May 2011, 17:18
Just wanted to say in addition to my comment on V&V this image makes your post even more heartfelt Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, Frida. Thank you.
This is a sensitive issue.
I think we really have to evaluate all the pros and cons before we legalise it.
Sending a message such as, "death can solve it", can be misleading and rather pessimistic.

Life is just like a gamble.
If you fight back, you might win.
Ginnie Hart: Yes, LC. This is a very sensitive issue...in come places, but not in all. I think that's what amazed me about what happened here in The Netherlands. It was so 'natural'. No one questioned it in Joekie's situation. Astrid says it is NOT easy to get the legal OK for it here...it really has to be a clear-cut case of no possible cure. Joekie fought like the dickens. No one questioned that. Rather than prolong a senseless fight, she basically called a truce! I think she was very brave to do so...as was her closest family.
A striking sculpture, Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: It somehow seemed appropriate, Tom. Thanks.
  • Oscar
  • Spain
  • 30 May 2011, 22:54
I like this processing! and a different angle
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, Oscar. Muchas gracias.
  • CherryPie
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 31 May 2011, 00:03
This is such a perfect image smile

I have made some comments at V&V too.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, dear Cherie!
  • tede
  • France
  • 31 May 2011, 07:45
A very beautiful moving image and a subject is still taboo in France and that is unfortunate. Ginnie nice day.
Ginnie Hart: Merci, dear Tede. I hate that this topic has become so taboo almost everywhere. We think nothing about giving mercy to our beloved animals, not wanting them to suffer. But somehow when it comes to humans, we revert to a different 'system'. I agree...it's unfortunate. Sigh.
excellent edition. Great drama. A greeting.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Pedro. Gracias.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 31 May 2011, 10:37
"We take care of the animal kingdom mercifully (when our pets are dying especially) but switch gears when it comes to people" - Ginnie, I think, there is a difference -nobody cares for an ill or dying animal, but we humans have the caring feelings to help each other - and I think it could be a special challenge and calling to us humans to support a deathly ill person and to accompany this person till his/her end- but I have to admit that I cannot know what I would do until I were in that situation.
A friend told me about a Dutch woman (living in Winterberg/Sauerland) who experienced from her doctor for the first time that she was suffering by breast cancer -after only 5 months she was dead by 'euthanasia', my friend, neighbour of this woman, was very upset when she heard that.
Ginnie Hart: Yes, Philine. Everything you say is correct...on your side of the aisle. I understand this. It really IS a debate, and often very heated. I have friends whose pets were more important to them than their own children/relatives...who put them mercifully to sleep. I personally do not compare animals to humans but there are plenty who do. I feel for them in those situations. And surely, even here in The Netherlands and in Belgium and Switzerland, the 3 countries where euthanasia is legal, there are those who are against it. I understand this and I grieve over the debate. I grieve over both sides. Once the debate is put aside, I grieve most for those who suffer, either way! In Joekie's case, which made this all very up-close and personal the first time in my life, I was struck by how 'natural' it all seemed. It surprised me.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 31 May 2011, 11:38
Sorry, I thought of an ill or dying animal in the wildness of nature..., human beings are caring for their ill pets/animals, of course but then they put them mercifully to sleep - but what should they do else? There are not any other ways for them I think.
I think that the debate about 'active Sterbehilfe' (German term ) has been sharpened by some kinds of "dying-tourism" to Switzerland. 'Passive Sterbehilfe', that means no machines, no artificial nutrition, let the human being die according to nature ..., is not any problem for me- and in my 'Patientenverfügung'/living will I ask not to do such things if there is not any help.
Your moving posting has provoked many comments and many thanks for your thoughtful, touching replies!
Ginnie Hart: I have the same kind of Living Will, Philine, where I have asked to not be kept alive by artificial means. DNR is also a term we use: Do Not Resuscitate. In America, of course, we have no option in our Living Wills for euthanasia. That sounds like an oxymoron, doesn't it!

You are very kind, Philine, and I know you are wise and thoughtful in all things. I doubt if this issue will ever be 'resolved' in such a way that all see eye to eye. Maybe that's good. Maybe we're meant to live with the tension so that it doesn't become 'easy' to play around with life and/or death?!
Wonderful word play Ginnie. I like this black and white rendition and the point of view. A heart felt tribute to Joekie.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, Doug. Your words will mean a lot to Astrid, as they also do to me.
A moving statue with your story of Joekie!
Ginnie Hart: Hartstikke bedankt, Wim. The entire story has greatly moved me.
Nice strong image, Ginnie...
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, Larry.
  • Paule
  • United States
  • 31 May 2011, 18:23
Powerful photo.

Paule
www.paulepictures.com
www.paulepictures.com/blog
Ginnie Hart: It is for me, too, Paule. Thanks.
  • rian
  • United States
  • 5 Jun 2011, 18:28
that's a cool play of words.. smile nice capture too..
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, kind sir.

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