Hart & Soul

04 Feb 2008 868 views
 
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photoblog image Under Watchful Eye

Under Watchful Eye


This is a series from the Utrecht Dom/Cathedral from when Astrid/Picturit and I were there on January 15.

Don't you wonder exactly WHAT they have seen and heard over the years?!

[Today I'm in Atlanta.]


Under Watchful Eye


This is a series from the Utrecht Dom/Cathedral from when Astrid/Picturit and I were there on January 15.

Don't you wonder exactly WHAT they have seen and heard over the years?!

[Today I'm in Atlanta.]


comments (41)

They look sad about it too.
Ginnie Hart: I don't think I realized their sadness so much until everyone started commenting on it, Mary. Isn't THAT interesting! Thanks.
  • Helen
  • Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
  • 4 Feb 2008, 00:42
Yes, they do look sad and I do wonder things like that! The tone makes this photo for me!
Ginnie Hart: Me, too, Helen...the sadness and the tone. Thank you.
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 4 Feb 2008, 02:17
I often wonder what the sculpture had in the mine. Good capture
Ginnie Hart: Exactly, Vinatge. Assuming it was a man, what was he trying to tell us?! Thanks.
Oh wow - see what you saw and thought here? I bet if I did not read that, I might have thought differently!

And now I have the delima, I can't decide which camera(s) to bring with me... Bring more or not... ugh! I've got time but still, there is the what if factor in the end if I don't bring both! help help help!
Ginnie Hart: I have my camera down to my favorite 24-105 lens, Jen. It's a GOOD (Canon L series) lens and seems to be the overall best lens for everything. So I personally would stick to one camera (I never use my S3 IS any more!) and one lens for travel, because it gets so "complicated" otherwise. But that's me. You will know what to do when the time comes, I'm sure.

In the meantime, thanks for stopping by and commenting! We go way back, friend! smile
A lot of sadness in their eyes ! But these 2 sculptures are almost human in their attitude...
Ginnie Hart: I agree, Flo. I wish I could get into their heads!! smile Thanks.
I wonder if they were merchants or noblemen. Nice old statues…
Ginnie Hart: Good question, Calusarus! Thanks.
  • Astrid
  • the Netherlands
  • 4 Feb 2008, 05:03
These two were at the far end in the corner of the Dom, we both were surprised about the sadness on their faces, I think they have seen a lot of sorrow passing by over the years, they saw how people destroyed other images and statues in the Dom, I would be sad too, you captured this very well, I love the way you croped this one, doordat het linkse figuur wat donderder van kleur is, krijgt de foto de diepte die het nu heeft, ondanks de wat fletse kleuren, een geweldige foto weer, mijn vriend, the color of the left one is slighty darker than the other, that bringst the depth in this picture
Ginnie Hart: I love how you were alongside of me to see these same images, Astrid. It means you are able to add to these photos with your insightful words. Ontzettend bedankt, mijn vriend.
  • navin
  • India
  • 4 Feb 2008, 05:08
Very nice shot. Just wondering why would anyone make such statues with such sad expressions
Ginnie Hart: Very good question, Navin. I wonder if we'll ever know! Thanks.

I STILL cannot find links for comments on your site! sad
  • Gale
  • Cape of Storms
  • 4 Feb 2008, 05:38
Yes very sad... worn with time. Great shot Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: It amazes me how intact these sculptures still are after all the years AND the Iconoclast Fury, Gale! Thanks.
magnifiques détails
Ginnie Hart: Merci, dear O-P.
  • anniedog
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 4 Feb 2008, 07:58
They look so miserable but then they have been perched up there for hundreds of years! I wonder what they have seen. You have captured some good detail here.
Ingrid
Ginnie Hart: They DO look miserable, Ingrid. I totally agree. Thanks.
  • Tracy
  • Stoke on Trent UK
  • 4 Feb 2008, 08:07
The stories they could tell isn't worth thinking about..WOW

They do look unhappy, but then again so would I if I had to support those pillars for hundreds of years....smile

Lovely composition and detail Ginnie..
Ginnie Hart: I'm quite sure we would be totally bogged down with their stories if we had to hear them. You're right, Tracy! Our own stories are hard enough! smile Thanks, M'Lady.
These statue were often maimed by the protestants when they took over the "Popish" churches in the sixteenth century. Most of the statues in churches were smashed completely, so these escaped more or less in one piece; they were probably high up.
Ginnie Hart: Yes, these WERE high up, Wim, so they were escapees, for sure. Now I wonder if they wished they hadn't survived! Thanks.
They look resigned sitting on their feet as if they had to support the pilars for years and years as a punishment. Fine shot Ginnie
Ginnie Hart: Maybe THAT'S why they look so sad, Richard. Makes sense to me. Thanks.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 4 Feb 2008, 08:20
O tempora, o mores! The 'results' of the horrible Iconoclast fury can be seen her again! These two sculptures present prophets filled with so much sadness about the errors and sins of their folk ; look at their faces! One one of the scroll (Schriftband)you might read: "O my people, they which lead thee cause thee to err, and destroy the way of thy paths." (Isaiah 3:12), on the other could be engraved: "Woe unto him that buildeth his house by unrighteousness, and his chambers by wrong; that useth his neighbour's service without wages, and giveth him not for his work;
That saith, I will build me a wide house and large chambers, and cutteth him out windows; and it is cieled with cedar, and painted with vermilion.
Shalt thou reign, because thou closest thyself in cedar? did not thy father eat and drink, and do judgment and justice, and then it was well with him?
He judged the cause of the poor and needy; then it was well with him: was not this to know me? saith the LORD.
But thine eyes and thine heart are not but for thy covetousness, and for to shed innocent blood, and for oppression, and for violence, to do it." (Ieremia 22:13-17). Are these sentences not very up-to-date? A very, very impressive sculpture art- photo- of timeless signification and importance! Thanks, Ginnie !
Ginnie Hart: WOW, Philine. Those are surely the words on their scrolls. The very words read down through the ages, generation after generation! Thank you for reminding me of them. So well written.
  • chad
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 4 Feb 2008, 08:47
You are showing us just how much detail there is in churches. We so often miss a lot of it.
Ginnie Hart: Yes, we do, Chad. I could go back and look all over again and find 10,000 more things I totally missed, I'm sure! Thanks.
  • blackdog
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 4 Feb 2008, 08:56
To me they look more pained than sad - it is the way the sculptor has brought the eyebrows together - especially the one on the right.
Ginnie Hart: Pained is a good word, Mike. They look like sentries on the mountain who see the armies coming and know they re out-numbered and out-witted. Thanks.
  • ray
  • Thailand
  • 4 Feb 2008, 11:14
A beautifully presented selection of ancient "sad sacks", Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: HA! Couldn't have said it better myself, Ray! smile
  • Roger
  • United States
  • 4 Feb 2008, 11:21
Very cool shot Ginnie. I am curious to what these are. I will have to go read today. They look really sad.
Ginnie Hart: If you find out anything, Roger, please let me know. smile Thanks.
  • Kathryn
  • Germany
  • 4 Feb 2008, 11:45
In pain is right..they look as if they are physically in pain. This reminds me of the German stories for children that were used to scare children into doing or not doing certain things. I wonder what has caused such pain for these two. You know there is a moral to their story.
Ginnie Hart: The Grimm's Brothers, Kathryn??? Oh yes. Those were/are some stories! I like the parallel to these pained men. Don't you wonder what the moral is to THIS story!
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 4 Feb 2008, 11:49
The fury or the acid rain struck again. I am sort of surpised that you didn't process this one in your usual brown layer.

Great picture.
Ginnie Hart: Now that you've said it, Louis, I'M surprised as well. Never even thought of it!!! Thanks for the idea, though. smile
  • Ruth
  • United States
  • 4 Feb 2008, 12:02
They look like a somber pair. Beautiful detail here.
Ginnie Hart: Somber is a good word here, Ruth! Thanks.
Nice details churches have.
Ginnie Hart: Some of them are nicer than others, Chantal. smile Thanks.
BEAU te rends tu compte du nombre de coups de ciseaux et de maillet pour sculpter une oeuvre dans la masse.Le drapé est genial les batisseurs de cathedrales c'etaient des GRANDS
Ginnie Hart: I love these details, Lecracleur. Thanks for your comment.
  • Martin
  • United States
  • 4 Feb 2008, 15:48
They certainly look worn down enough to reflect all they have seen.
Ginnie Hart: Yes, indeed, Martin. Thanks.
  • Dave Wilkins
  • Recovering from surgery in Ireland
  • 4 Feb 2008, 16:50
News can't have been that good...they don't look at all happy :-(
Ginnie Hart: I think the news must have been terrible, you're right. Thanks, Dave.
  • tim
  • United Kindom
  • 4 Feb 2008, 17:33
quite a lot no doubt but by the look on their faces its not made them happysmile lovely shot Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: To think the sculptor made them start out that way makes you wonder even more, Tim! Thanks.
  • Ann
  • Suc sur Erdre - France
  • 4 Feb 2008, 18:10
They seem to be so sad ...
Ginnie Hart: Yes, they do, Ann. sad
  • Reza
  • Canada
  • 4 Feb 2008, 20:08
Wonderful details here. Well done.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Reza!
  • Chris
  • Isle of Wight, UK
  • 4 Feb 2008, 21:29
They could fill many lifetimes Ginnie smile
Ginnie Hart: I think you're right, Chris! Thanks.
They have been bearing a great burden, anyway. I suggest that these people are some VIPs who made building the cathedral possible (architect, funds provider?)Symbolically it makes sense because without them the church wouldn't be stable and firm. This cathedral is really a treasure for photography!
Ginnie Hart: HA! VIPs indeed, Erik. I like that. Thanks!
  • mickyboy
  • North Yorkshire
  • 4 Feb 2008, 22:09
I am sure they have seen everything and heard all sorts but, I dont think they have smelled much lately as they have no noses left. poor things.LOL
Ginnie Hart: HA! You are so right, Mick. smile Thanks.
  • Aussie
  • Back on nights
  • 4 Feb 2008, 22:47
Sorrow of time is etched on their faces. Or is it just that they have had to sit hunched up like that for so long. you have captured the detail so well Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: Sorrow of time. I like that, Aussie. Thank you.
  • Bill Phillips
  • Droitwich...has been a nice day on the whole
  • 4 Feb 2008, 22:51
They would have some tales to tell! Nice textures ...B&W would be interesting
Ginnie Hart: I still can't believe I didn't think of B&W/sepia, Bill. You're right because it would have been perfect. Thanks.
  • Ellie
  • United Kingdom
  • 4 Feb 2008, 23:45
These are amazing carvings Ginnie, they look as if they were made only yesterday, they're so crisp. Isn't it such a pity about the damage.
The one on the left looks as if he might have been important - chain of office and so on, also as if he's looking at some sort of document.
Ginnie Hart: I bet you've seen much of this Iconoclastic Fury yourself in Portugal, Ellie? It IS sad. But thank God enough remains to get a good clue of what was originally there. Thanks.
The detail the medieval artisans could reproduce still manages to amaze me. These are two great little sculptures, full of pathos and life as well. Well seen Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: I know what you mean, Les, and I totally agree. Thanks.
  • L.Reis
  • Portugal
  • 5 Feb 2008, 12:41
...only their hearts of stone could endure all the stories lost in time...
another beautiful detail...
Ginnie Hart: I know you're right, dear Lina. How else could they stand it! Thanks.
They've probably heard too many lies and seen to many conflicts, hence the sadness grin

Great capture.
Ginnie Hart: I'm sure you're right, Kunle! Very true.
Doubtlessly, these capitals have seen in front of spend many years of history them!
Ginnie Hart: You are very right, José Angel. They have seen a lot! Thanks.
Good question ! Certainly very hard things of war and war again...
Ginnie Hart: Yes, Zeb. It makes you wonder.
how sad.....nice tho
Ginnie Hart: Don't you wonder what they're all about!!!

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