Hart & Soul

28 Sep 2007 807 views
 
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photoblog image Becoming Queen Anne

Becoming Queen Anne


This week I'm doing a series of posts on The Farm from when we were there in Michigan back in August.

In the fields around The Farm, Queen Anne's Lace grows in abundance.  Ruth will go out and collect bouquets of it for her house.  After reading Wiki, I don't know if this is before she blooms or afterwards, when it becomes what you Britishers call the Bird's Nest.

This isn't as pin-sharp as I'd like it to be and I don't like the busy background (I'm still learning about DOF!), but I wanted you to see what I saw.  Hopefully your Friday will unravel itself before the weekend and not be this complicated!


[Today I'm in Atlanta.]


Becoming Queen Anne


This week I'm doing a series of posts on The Farm from when we were there in Michigan back in August.

In the fields around The Farm, Queen Anne's Lace grows in abundance.  Ruth will go out and collect bouquets of it for her house.  After reading Wiki, I don't know if this is before she blooms or afterwards, when it becomes what you Britishers call the Bird's Nest.

This isn't as pin-sharp as I'd like it to be and I don't like the busy background (I'm still learning about DOF!), but I wanted you to see what I saw.  Hopefully your Friday will unravel itself before the weekend and not be this complicated!


[Today I'm in Atlanta.]


comments (37)

lovely shot, I like the idea of putting this dead center.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Dotun.
  • Martin
  • United States
  • 28 Sep 2007, 00:35
That's a crazy looking plant! It looks like a million flowers rolled into a ball. Thanks for sharing it!
Ginnie Hart: When you see what it looks like when it's open, Martin, it's really hard to believe it can fold up into something so compact and complicated! It IS like a million flowers rolled into a ball! Thanks for putting it that way!
I like the squarish crop and the fact that there is still some detail in the background. That's quite a spiky looking bundle of life.
Ginnie Hart: Yes it is, Red Pen, and thanks.
  • Ruth
  • Michigan, USA
  • 28 Sep 2007, 00:39
I agree with Martin, this looks like no QAL I've seen, all those little blooms, and more blooms. Nice catch!
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Ruth. This still confuses me. Apparently this is AFTER she blooms. So, when you bring those flowers into your house, do they do this before they die? So many questions. I want to see the entire birth-death progression now! smile
This is after the bloom, Ginnie. i love them in bouquets too but they are wicked pollen droppers. Beautiful when in bloom.
Ginnie Hart: That's what Wiki says, Mary, so I'm gonna take your word for it. As I told Ruth, now I want to see the entire birth-death cycle to see exactly what it does! Thanks.
What an awesome looking plant - never seen anything like it!
Ginnie Hart: It is also awesome when it's open and in bloom, PB. But I've never seen such a muddle from a plant in all my life. Thanks.
  • ray
  • Thailand
  • 28 Sep 2007, 03:44
I have never seen this plant before, Ginnie.
I think your image is excellent. Subject stands out from the background quite well enough for one to get a 3D sense of how it looks; and it looks dense and complex. Greens are nicely saturated.
Ginnie Hart: I bet you've seen it in it's blooming phase, Ray, because it's very ordinary. I just had never seen it do this, apparently when it's giving up the ghost!

You're very kind, as always. Wait till tomorrow. It's for you. smile
  • rags
  • United States
  • 28 Sep 2007, 04:30
Thats one cool looking plant! This is the first time i've ever seen it. Thanks for sharing it with us.
Ginnie Hart: Glad I could share it, Rags. I have often seen her in bloom but I had never seen her at this stage, so it was new for me as well. Thanks.
  • Roland
  • France
  • 28 Sep 2007, 06:43
I do like how the nature can show us so many different things... Liek this one !
Ginnie Hart: I whole-heartedly agree, Roland. Thanks.
  • Olaide
  • Fort Collins, CO USA
  • 28 Sep 2007, 06:45
awesome.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Olaide.
lovely . Nice DOF.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million, Sarthak.
This is an unusual plant to me Ginnie. Its quite interesting.
Ginnie Hart: Absolutely, Etomi. Now I want to see the entire birth-death cycle to see exactly where this part comes in! Thanks.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 28 Sep 2007, 07:52
Oh yes, really wonderful like a wedding bouquet! Mother Nature creates the most beautiful works of art (and the life writes the best stories)!Ook een prettig weekeind toegewenst van Philine
Ginnie Hart: You are such a sweetheart, Philine. I love reading your comments! Thanks.
  • Aussie
  • Queensland
  • 28 Sep 2007, 08:28
I've never seen anything like this before. Nice shot.
Ginnie Hart: Me neither, Aussie. Now I want to see the entire birth-death cycle to see where this part comes in. To me it looks like it's starting to open but apparently it's starting to die. Unbelievable. Thanks.
Yet another "interesting" image tongue
Ginnie Hart: HA! And I won't say "there he goes again!" smile
Background's fine, I reckon this would make a good monochrome. As a Britisher I have never seen this plant, or worse still heard of it. So off to Wiki for me.
Ginnie Hart: I was actually surprised to find out it comes from Europe, Bill, so we're in the same boat. We see this all the time in bloom but I had never seen it in this stage. I felt like I got my education! Thanks.
  • Tracy
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 28 Sep 2007, 08:59
WOW Never seen anything like this before. Avery interesting Flower indeed Ginnie. DOF seems ok to me. smile
Ginnie Hart: I know, Tracy. It has quite amazed me. Now I want to see the entire birth-death cycle to see where this part fits in. You're a sweetheart. Thanks.
odd flower, nice capture.
Ginnie Hart: Very odd indeed, Chantal. Thanks.
This is a nice shot. Your DOF is fine. I have found pin sharp is hard to get without a tripod. You are close enough. If you went for a faster shutter speed, your appature would have changed and the DOF would be less so you did just fine. No Worries. It's a lovely shot.
Ginnie Hart: With my Image Stabilization, Gail, I've never had to use a tripod on these close-ups, but maybe I should have. All the finagling of shutter speed and aperture is still new for me, so I feel like I'm learning as I go. But it sure is fun. Thanks for your comment, as always.
  • Pilgrim
  • United Kingdom
  • 28 Sep 2007, 15:44
Lovely image again Ginnie. It looks an interesting plant but I don't recognise it from over here in the UK - but then it's the wife who is the plant expert....... I'll have to get her to have a look. David.
Ginnie Hart: We usually see them in bloom, and that's probably what even you would recognize, David. But seeing it like this totally stunned me. Whoever would have thought! I'll be interested to see if your wife has seen this. Thanks.
superbe boule de beauté.
Ginnie Hart: Yes it is, O-P. Thank you.
  • anniedog
  • United Kingdom
  • 28 Sep 2007, 17:36
This looks pretty sharp to me Ginnie and I actually think that the blurred green of the background sets it off very well. You seem to have mastered the DOF fine.
Ingrid
Ginnie Hart: Thanks for your vote of confidence, Ingrid. It probably would have looked different/better if I hadn't done a macro but zoomed in. Oh well. Thanks.
beautiful speciment...has such a complicated oranamental thing about it...
Ginnie Hart: It is definitely complicated, Sam! Thanks for stopping by!
Wow - Great one !
Bravo !!!!
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, my friend!
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 28 Sep 2007, 18:31
Never seen a plant like this, but when I see it I will remember that it has something to do with some queen's underwear - busy, oh not that - lacy. The way to remember it smile

I don't think the background is that busy. Great shot and detail.
Ginnie Hart: HA! Lace it is, then. And I'll remember that! smile Thanks.
  • bridge
  • Nigeria
  • 28 Sep 2007, 19:23
Great shot Ginnie. Like your DOF. Interesting plant, thanks for sharing.
Ginnie Hart: Great to see you back, Bridge. smile Thanks.
  • chris
  • south of the border!
  • 28 Sep 2007, 22:11
Nicely done Ginnie smile
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, kind sir!
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 28 Sep 2007, 22:49
Very interesting - never seen anything like this before. Only nature could do this - strange that its called Queen Anne's lace - we need Tiff's advice on this one, but it might be related to what we call Cow's Parsley.
Ginnie Hart: It IS related to Cow's Parsley, Mike! Exactly. But this rolled up ball doesn't look anything like it when it's in bloom, does it! Thanks.
  • Scarlet
  • Netherlands
  • 28 Sep 2007, 23:15
I've never seen anything like this in my life. I love this flower/plant. Thanks for showing it to me Ginnie!
Ginnie Hart: It really is the strangest thing, isn't it, Scarlet. Thanks for stopping by.
  • Helen
  • United States
  • 28 Sep 2007, 23:39
Great shot. Great DOF! This is a strange looking plant!
Ginnie Hart: It is indeed very strange in this phase, Helen. Otherwise, it's pretty normal! Thanks.
It had never seen a Queen like this! One talks about the crown? Nice image! smile
Ginnie Hart: Me neither, Jose. I think we all got our education on this one!
I've seen them brown and dead in this shape, but never green and dying. I always find myself looking at open Queen Anne's Lace flowers to see if they have the purple dot in the centre. I have no idea why!
Ginnie Hart: I never knew about that purple/red dot till I read it on Wiki, Karen. I guess you of all people would know about this plant! Glad I was able to show you something new. smile Thanks.
  • tetsu
  • Tokyo, Japan
  • 29 Sep 2007, 05:15
Wow!!! impressive! smile
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Tetsu, for stopping by and commenting.
I like it. I think the dof is fine. All the best, Dave.
Ginnie Hart: You're very kind, Dave. Thanks.
I've seen lots of QAL in bloom, and also completely dried up and knocked over, but never like this! It's like a Chinese puzzle! Great shot!
Ginnie Hart: I like that description, Patrushka: a Chinese puzzle indeed! Thanks.
I love this image...and I know the queen well smile Growing up north (in oh canada) is runs rampant. I've always known it to be a weed, but a beautiful one at that. When I got married, the florist added in queen anne's lace saying what a beautiful accent flower it was....and I got it, even though I think of it as a weed, but again, a beautiful, and unique one at that.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you so much for stopping by and commenting, Julie. I actually think some of the weeds are the prettiest flowers around. smile
I have a book about the myths and folklore of flowers. For some reason, Queen Anne`s Lace is supposed to stand for self-reliance. I wonder why?

In England, it was considered bad luck to bring it indoors.

Love the photograph, Ginnie. Such an intricate construction - fascinating! (:o)

Just been enjoying catching up on your photographs - always such an enjoyable experience. (:o)
Ginnie Hart: You are so sweet, Roz. You just made my day! Thank you ever so much.

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