Hart & Soul

26 Jul 2007 823 views
 
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photoblog image Outside My Comfort Zone

Outside My Comfort Zone

This is a series of pics from when we were at the family cottage in Michigan over the Fourth of July.

It's getting dark out.  Well, that's because we're getting ready for tomorrow's grand-finale pic of the fireworks (and the end of this cottage series!).

While we waited for the fireworks to start up all around the lake, I decided it was as good a time as any to start experimenting with shutter speed (my first time) and a tripod.  Today's pic is one second.  Tomorrow's is TEN seconds.  Hurray!  My goal is to learn all my camera settings by the end of 2007!

Okay, so it's not totally in focus, but give me a break!  This pic is about getting outside my comfort zone!

[Today I'm flying home from Amsterdam to Atlanta.]


Outside My Comfort Zone

This is a series of pics from when we were at the family cottage in Michigan over the Fourth of July.

It's getting dark out.  Well, that's because we're getting ready for tomorrow's grand-finale pic of the fireworks (and the end of this cottage series!).

While we waited for the fireworks to start up all around the lake, I decided it was as good a time as any to start experimenting with shutter speed (my first time) and a tripod.  Today's pic is one second.  Tomorrow's is TEN seconds.  Hurray!  My goal is to learn all my camera settings by the end of 2007!

Okay, so it's not totally in focus, but give me a break!  This pic is about getting outside my comfort zone!

[Today I'm flying home from Amsterdam to Atlanta.]


comments (32)

There's no learning without taking chances. What a pretty scene, Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: That's what I figured, Red Pen! Thanks. smile
  • Ted
  • http://rothphotos.blogspot.com/
  • 26 Jul 2007, 00:37
Terrific low light shot. I love the reflected lights. Had I looked here first, I might have posted one of my Southwest Harbor shots with the lit pier so we'd "twin," but your shot is better. the note implies you only took one shot or only shots at one second??? Are you using the histogram to check your exposures? Beautiful! Keep it up.
Ginnie Hart: I have a feeling this couldn't possibly be better than yours, Ted. I am so unexperienced with this kind of shot but I'm getting very excited about learning more about it! Thanks for your support.

In this case, all I did was take a bunch of shots (actually, a bunch of the next pic, that is) at different speeds. That's all I was doing. Next time I'll pay attention to the other "factors!" smile
Very pretty.
I found the best thing to use both with and without the tripod was a remote release button. It's amazing how much movement comes from just pressing the shutter.
Ginnie Hart: Before I dash off to the airport, I'll at least let y'all know that I DID use the self-timer for this shot! So I know this isn't camera shake (especially with the Image Stabilizer). It's something else and I'm quite sure with the help of everyone, I'll have it figured out in no time. I'll respond to everyone once I get back to Atlanta.

Thanks, Aussie. smile
This is a pretty scene Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Fehinti.
This is a very peaceful, calming scene. How pretty Ginnie. Congratulations on learning your camera settings. Keep up the good work..its paying off!
Ginnie Hart: Actually, DD, now that I've started, I'm pretty excited about really learning this stuff. No turning back! smile Thanks.
looks like a very peaceful spot. one thing i enjoy about photography is that you get to experiment and try new things. good job! smile
Ginnie Hart: Absolutely, Lizzie. This is something I should have tried a long time ago! Thanks for your support! smile
Beautiful View Granny :d
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, Sweetie!
Gin is that owl real ? If it is then my hats off to you even though it's on a perch. If it's not real my hats off to who ever thought of doing this. Lovely, lovely shot, don't care about the focus unless your trying to sell this then that's another matter.

J
Ginnie Hart: HA! No, that owl is not real, Johnny. It's supposed to keep the geese away from the beach but I'm afraid it's not doing a very good job. We had to do a major cleaning job before the family arrived!!

Thanks again for your kind support!
I don't think we will allow you back into your comfort zone smile I like this a lot! The owl (surely not real) is a very nice touch on top of the classic composition. I can't wait for the 10 second shot!
Ginnie Hart: You're right, Martin--the owl isn't real but is supposedly for keeping the geese off the beach! Hasn't worked yet! smile

And thanks for your kind encouragement. I'm actually getting quite excited about "perfecting" the technique.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 26 Jul 2007, 02:28
Really, really excellent shot, Ginnie. I very much have a feeling you shot this image at the tail-end of dusk. Your 1 sec exposure has put a languid softness onto the lake's ripples, and I love that.
Ginnie Hart: Well, you are way too kind, Ray, because this is just an "I don't know what I'm doing yet" shot!! But thanks for your encouragement!!
  • Kay
  • 26 Jul 2007, 05:28
Ginnie, I need to set goals like that (just what Marybeth said).
This picture is going into my likey's. There are quite a few of your pics in there to inspire me. smile
Ginnie Hart: You are way too kind to put this in your Likeys, Kay (guess you didn't read Suby's comment, which came after yours!). It really does NOT deserve to be there. But if this is a source of inspiration for anyone to start learning this stuff, then good. I'm actually getting quite excited about learning. I think I've finally caught the bug. smile
Nice to know that you are working on those goals really seriously Ginnie. Keep up the tempo - I'm sure this is gonna be comfort zone real soon. Good Luck smile
Ginnie Hart: I really hope so, Thomas! I do think I've caught the bug, so maybe there's hope yet! smile Thanks for your encouragement!
Well composed and nicely done Ginnie ! Have a nice day !
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Roland!
j'aime beaucoup les photos de bord d'eau. il y a tjrs un calme et une sérénité.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, O-P.
Well done Ginnie .. and make sure you master all the settings by the end of the year so we can enjoy more pictures from you ..
Ginnie Hart: I'm gonna do my best, Shakara. smile Thanks.
  • Olaide
  • Fort Collins, CO, USA
  • 26 Jul 2007, 08:55
oh sweet.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks for stopping by and commenting, Olaide.
Great atmosphere... love how the owl is camouflaged into thr whole scene...


kind regards,
Lu mik spastiek'
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million, Lu Mik.
  • PhotoSam
  • London, U.K.
  • 26 Jul 2007, 11:40
very good low light shot...
Ginnie Hart: Well, not exactly good, Sam, but one to get me going to learn how to do it better! Thanks.
Sorry Ginnie, NO LIKEY sad
Ginnie Hart: Are you serious, Suby (Sinem?). Do you really think I expected anyone to LIKE this shot, least of all you? This is my very first attempt at this kind of shot! Or maybe you didn't read my text? sad

This is a good example of why we love to hate you! But just wait. One of these days I'm gonna WOW you. grin
  • Saed
  • Iran
  • 26 Jul 2007, 12:33
Nice night shot!
Ginnie Hart: Thanks for stopping by and commenting, Saed.
Simply lovely
Ginnie Hart: Well, you're too kind, Chad. But thanks anyway.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 26 Jul 2007, 13:43
Your focus spot seems to be somewhere between here and there - the light reflections of the other cabin is in focus somewhere in the middle.

The normal solution should be to pump up the apperture number - a narrower opening. You will require a longer shot, but you should have a longer focus range in return. Since you are on a tripod, it shouldn't present additional shake issues.
Ginnie Hart: Focus? HA! That never even entered my mind, Louis, until I saw the shot! grin I think I thought magic would happen with everything else if I just did something with the shutter speed. But now I know better. With the help of many of you, especially Martin (who's the night-light pro on SC, it seems), I have some good tips for going forward. I've been bit by the bug!! smile Thanks.
We all have to learn and experimenting is the only way. I am doing the same with a long way to go. Keep it up Ginnie its worth it in the end, i'm sure you will agree.smile
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million for your encouragement and support, Tracy. I know it will be worth it in the end, for sure!
Hi Ginnie - given you were using tripod and self timer, and it looks like there was no wind it is the shallow depth of field combined with your point of focus that has caused the problem (unless you were jumping up and down next to the camera with excitment). To stay at f3.5 you would need to decide which is the subject and focus on that - if it is all equally important then you will have to close the aperture down to f8 or f11 and have a slower shutter speed. In this case the slight ripples on the lake may vanish and spoil your delicate lighting. I hope I haven't confused you! Basically you are doing the right thing taking control of the camera - keep experimenting and your understanding will come. We have all been thro this phase. Mike
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million for your encouragement and support, Mike. I have been so excited by the helpful tips from everyone! I think the bug has bit me and I can hardly wait to perfect the technique. smile
Looks like somewhere id like to be right now.
Ginnie Hart: Me, too, Busola! smile
I tried to master all the settings on my camera and it made a lot of difference even though i didnt complete the excercise. Might have to take some dodgy pics before the difference starts to sho. All the best Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks for your encouragement and support, Busola. I'm quite excited about learning this stuff!
Good trip again, Ginnie!
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Jose. It WAS a good trip back home.
  • chunter
  • Salisbury, Wiltshire. UK.
  • 27 Jul 2007, 15:35
Yes, you have an eye for a composition. Spot on. I like what you're doing in the square format. Keep up the experimentation and don't hesitate to ask for advice. (I may learn something from the answers that avalanche upon you!)

Louis said more or less what I was going to say concerning focus.

I would only add that, if you are going to to make longer exposure shots on a tripod, also use a shutter-release cable because you can still jiggle the camera as you press the shutter if you don't. (I won't go into mirror lock up just yet, you'll be pleased to hear!)
Ginnie Hart: I really have appreciated the encouragement and support of everyone, including you, Colin. Thank you very much. I have learned a lot already and have been bit by the bug to learn this stuff!!

I did use the self-timer on the camera. Do you find that a cable is better than the timer? My camera has Image Stabilization, so I don't think what you see here is shake, thankfully.
  • Ruth
  • Michigan/Ireland at the moment
  • 27 Jul 2007, 22:14
That's one of my favorite cottages on the lake, and this makes a lovely shot. Good one.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Ruth. Next time maybe I'll get it in focus. smile
Very quiet, very nice - Once time more I'd like to be there !
Ginnie Hart: HA! I think you WERE there, Zeb, in your mind's eye. smile
You have caught the light perfectly; it is like being there. All the best, Dave.
Ginnie Hart: I'm gonna learn this stuff if it kills me, Dave. Thanks. smile
  • chunter
  • Salisbury, Wiltshire. UK.
  • 3 Aug 2007, 08:54
Aahhh - Ginnie! I see the problem. When you are using a tripod, you should turn the image stabilizer OFF. I didn't understand that at first, but I've since learned that when it's on, the gyros it uses are always active and hunting for something to correct, so even though the camera is perfectly still, the gyros are at work moving the lens slightly. Over a slow exposure, this is more apparent than at a faster one and is probably the cause of the slight softness in this one. (It also saves battery power!)

On the other matter, a self-timer is perfectly fine, but you don't have the ultimate control of exactly when to release the shutter that a cable gives you. If you want to wait for a particular cloud formation, for example, or for people (or other wildlife) to move into a particular position, then a cable is more precise. If that's not an issue, then no problem.

Good luck with the experimentation. Looking good so far.
Ginnie Hart: Wow, Colin. I had no clue about the IS issue! I'll have to pay attention to that. Thanks a million for the heads up!

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for this photo I'm in a constructive critical comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon PowerShot S3 IS
exposure mode shutter priority
shutterspeed 1s
aperture f/3.5
sensitivity unknown
focal length 17.3mm
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