Hart & Soul

30 Jun 2007 709 views
 
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photoblog image On This Rock

On This Rock

This is a mini-series on The Cloisters of NYC.  It's a composite structure that incorporates elements from five medieval French cloisters which were disassembled and reassembled in Upper Manhattan in 1934-38.   You can read more about it here.  We visited there in April.

This is the size of a cement block, sitting on the wall.  It almost blends in with the wall, if you don't pay attention.  I almost didn't post this, but look at that carving!  I'm guessing it's limestone.
Once again, I don't have a clue.  It wasn't described in the book we bought.


[Today I'm in Atlanta.]


On This Rock

This is a mini-series on The Cloisters of NYC.  It's a composite structure that incorporates elements from five medieval French cloisters which were disassembled and reassembled in Upper Manhattan in 1934-38.   You can read more about it here.  We visited there in April.

This is the size of a cement block, sitting on the wall.  It almost blends in with the wall, if you don't pay attention.  I almost didn't post this, but look at that carving!  I'm guessing it's limestone.
Once again, I don't have a clue.  It wasn't described in the book we bought.


[Today I'm in Atlanta.]


comments (19)

It's so intricate. Imagine the patience and skill required to carve this.
Ginnie Hart: That's what I thought, Red Pen. So much detail in a significantly small amount of space! Thanks.
Maybe when they reassembled the cloister, they had a piece left over (a sort of "oops, where does this go?") so they just put it on display without making a big deal of it. It's certainly worth looking at though. I'm glad you posted it.
Ginnie Hart: There were several items like this around, Karen, that were easy to miss if you weren't paying attention. I took another pic of this straight on, where you couldn't see the depth of the block. This one seemed much better to post. Thanks.
  • Jimbo
  • Dublin, Ireland
  • 30 Jun 2007, 03:14
The carving IS pretty amazing. That must be a strong metal bracket to hold the weight.
Ginnie Hart: I was wondering myself how heavy that would be, Jimbo. If it's sandstone, it might not be as heavy as it looks. Regardless, it does look like a hefty chunk! Thanks.
another great capture of the carvings!
love the textures, details and tones here!
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million, Kairospix!
I always prefer it when curators/restorers make clear what is old and what is new - this makes the point wonderfully. To have it at the right height on the wall as the last remaining fragment makes for a powerful image. Mike
Ginnie Hart: I hadn't thought about it like that, Mike--that this may be the last remaining fragment of whatever place they found it. That makes it even more powerful, you're right! Thanks for the thought.
This is a master piece. Bothe the carving and the picture are exqusite
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Sir Busola!
The photographs you have presented in this series just get better and better. Each day I have thought `this is my favourite`! Same thing today - this is a really beautiful photograph, of an intricate caving. (:o)
Ginnie Hart: You're a sweetheart, Rosalyn. Thank you!
Ginnie, your angle here is fantastic. The carving is just amazing. Wonderful shot.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, Bridge. As I just told Karen, I took another pic of this straight on, where you couldn't see the depth of the block. This one seemed much better to post. Glad you like it! smile
  • paul
  • 30 Jun 2007, 10:36
definitely worth posting Ginnie - fascinating
Ginnie Hart: Thanks for saying so, Paul!
  • don
  • Spokane
  • 30 Jun 2007, 14:47
A find carving that must be the result of many hours of very careful, artistic effort. It took a master craftsman to produce such an intricate design. I'm glad you shared it with us.
Ginnie Hart: Now I'm glad I posted this, Don. Thanks for your vote. smile
The detail is amazing! It is well worth posting. To my untrained eye the stone looks like limestone, which is much easier to carve than sandstone and is quite abundant in the south of France.
Ginnie Hart: You know, Martin, I believe it IS limestone and will correct my text. That was my blunder. Thanks for the heads-up.
Art of this quality from our past reminds us that for all our technological advancement, our basic outlook hasn't changed. I still wonder at the skill and love employed to carve this. Nice shot. All the best, Dave
Ginnie Hart: You are so right, Dave. Sometimes I think the artistic side of things back then was much more "developed" in the sense of more manual precision. Don't know but it would be fun to compare side-by-side artists with their tools from several centuries apart! Thanks.
  • Suby
  • Milton Keynes, UK
  • 1 Jul 2007, 14:23
Me likes

Suby
Ginnie Hart: Hmmmm. I'll take it, Suby. grin Thanks.
  • Ruth
  • Michigan, USA
  • 1 Jul 2007, 15:14
I'm glad you posted it too, the intricacy is great. And the design and imagination are so good, looks like it was from a frieze maybe? I admire this artisan. We have lost so much in our present structures that have hardly any handwork like this. I realize it's not affordable any more, and slave labor is nothing to be happy about. But these remnants of whatever was going on back then are a real treasure.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, Ruth, for your profound comment. One day you'll see all this with your own eyes...and will take your own pics!
this is brilliant...there are so many tones spread thorughout it...
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million, Sam.
  • Kay
  • 1 Jul 2007, 22:09
Wow, it's almost like a relief map of sorts. Well done, Ginnie!
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Kay. Glad I decided to post it after all.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 1 Jul 2007, 23:04
Your should publish a new book. Carving? it is not the 4th yet!

My guess is that it will be some middle eastern town/city that is carved out here. Another great one Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: Yeah, but then I'd really have to research this stuff...or just go back and take notes! HA! Now that's an idea.

Thanks, Louis.
  • Dreamwalker
  • 2 Jul 2007, 01:34
Beautiful carving.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, dear DW!
What amazes me is what they were able to create and how long it took them so long ago.
Great processing on this one!
Ginnie Hart: It amazes me as well, Julia. This whole place astounded me! Thanks.

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