Hart & Soul

26 Jun 2007 708 views
 
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photoblog image Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep

Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep

This is a mini-series on The Cloisters of NYC.  It's a composite structure that incorporates elements from five medieval French cloisters which were disassembled and reassembled in Upper Manhattan in 1934-38.   You can read more about it here.  We visited there in April.

We bought a book on The Cloisters because I wanted to be able to reference everything without writing it down while I was taking pics.  Alas, this statue was not in it!  All I can remember is that this is NOT the Virgin Mary.  But I don't remember if it's the Jesus Child.  If it is, remember, "it takes a village!"

[Today I'm in Atlanta.]


Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep

This is a mini-series on The Cloisters of NYC.  It's a composite structure that incorporates elements from five medieval French cloisters which were disassembled and reassembled in Upper Manhattan in 1934-38.   You can read more about it here.  We visited there in April.

We bought a book on The Cloisters because I wanted to be able to reference everything without writing it down while I was taking pics.  Alas, this statue was not in it!  All I can remember is that this is NOT the Virgin Mary.  But I don't remember if it's the Jesus Child.  If it is, remember, "it takes a village!"

[Today I'm in Atlanta.]


comments (28)

The woman has a weary countenance, doesn't she?
Ginnie Hart: Weary and somewhat worried, maybe? She sure does seem to be reflecting on something, Red Pen. Thanks.
  • Jimbo
  • Dublin, Ireland
  • 26 Jun 2007, 01:32
Whoever it's meant to represent, it's a lovely piece of work. Rather touching, with much more individuality than you'd expect from the period.
Ginnie Hart: It totally shocked me to see it, Jimbo. I don't remember ever seeing a sculpture anywhere of someone lying down with a baby!
  • Kay
  • 26 Jun 2007, 02:05
LOL at Red Pen! She does look tired. But I think everyone was back at that time.

It is a lovely piece of work as Jim said. Perhaps the sculpture is a self portrait?
Ginnie Hart: HA! I'm quite sure everyone WAS tired back then, Kay. Good point.

She also looks like she's reflecting on something that concerns her deeply. If the child IS the Christ Child, the sculptor surely captured the foreboding Journey to come.
The lady seems tired ! Wood I suspect ? Very scarce to find them with such colours. Very nice Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: Yes, Flo, I'm quite sure it's wood. It was the muted colors that really attracted me to the piece, besides the fact she was lying down! Thanks.
  • Inès
  • Belgium
  • 26 Jun 2007, 07:53
Very good job, we can think they are alive !
Ginnie Hart: Yes, Ines. And thanks for stopping by and commenting.
Interesting sculpture !!
Ginnie Hart: Yes, it is, Shakara. Makes you wonder what it's all about.
Somehow I have a feeling it is Anna, Mary's mother, with the latter as a baby.
Ginnie Hart: Maybe, Wim. I also wondered if it was Elizabeth with John the Baptist?
very good capture!
can see the details, textures and the contrasting colours very well!
great job!
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Kairospix. The muted colors really attracted me to this piece.
  • johnnyg
  • in and around Liverpool Street
  • 26 Jun 2007, 10:26
When I saw the thumb nail I thought wow Ginnie's taken a people shot smile Now I wondering just how old that statue is ? Looks like the shot does what it's suppose to do, make the viewer think !

J
Ginnie Hart: Well, we know it's from the medieval time, Johnny, so I'm guessing it's around the 12th-14th century. Amazing, when you think about it.
With the redness of her cheeks and her tired look I wonder if it represents illness. Since the baby is swaddled it could also be childbirth. Very nice shot no matter what it represents.
Ginnie Hart: That's a good possibility, Mary, though I see the baby's cheeks are also rosy. 'Course, they could both be sick! It does make you wonder, doesn't it!
Great capture Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Bridge.
  • Ruth
  • 26 Jun 2007, 12:19
The baby looks like Lesley when a baby, never slept! smile
Ginnie Hart: HA! Now you've tickled my funny bone, Ruth. grin
  • clarence
  • Irving, TX, USA
  • 26 Jun 2007, 12:19
This is a wonderful capture of a beautiful sculpture!
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Clarence.
  • Roger
  • Denton Texas
  • 26 Jun 2007, 14:32
Well my vote would have been Mary and Jesus. Perhaps it's someone we have never heard of. Is that possible? Could it just be a statue? No way smile
Ginnie Hart: From my very weak recollection, Roger, you may be totally right. That may be why I don't remember other than that it is NOT the Virgin Mary! Just a statue! Wow.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 26 Jun 2007, 14:32
In the thumbnail I thought Ginnie is taking a rest from the traipsing around in the cloisters, but no - she is still very much active.

Woman has big hands, I hope she doesn't find it necessary to wack the baby's bottom smile

Great picture - you are now outstripping the reference books smile
Ginnie Hart: LOL, Louis. I can see you had plenty of your own kids to know. grin

I'm guessing there is no book on The Cloisters that covers the approximately 5,000 pieces of medieval art there. But surely they could have included this one, since I liked it so much! smile
I like the composition - the way you have used the statue as a kind of leading line...
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million, Aksel.
  • Dotun
  • 26 Jun 2007, 15:03
well composed Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, sir.
  • don
  • Spokane
  • 26 Jun 2007, 15:41
An appealing image regardless who this represents. Very nice shot.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks for stopping by and commenting, Don!
  • Ted Roth
  • http://rothphotos.blogspot.com/
  • 26 Jun 2007, 15:46
It's the positions of the hands that I find especially affecting in the work, and your image places them beautifully.

check your book for works by Riemenschneider. He was a sculptor with an unusual ability to capture the humanity of his subjects. As such, his wrks are really as much in the Renaissance as the Middle Ages. They are among the greatestest treasures of the Cloisters.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Ted.

I do see Riemenschneider's work in my book but with nothing on this piece...which doesn't mean it's not his, of course. When you were there with your students, do you remember seeing it? I wondered if they move some pieces in and out of storage because they can't possibly display all 5,000 pieces of art at one time?
Very peaceful structure. I like this Ginnie...oohh while you're in Atlanta pls take nice pics if u have time.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Ngozi.

Pics of Atlanta? Well, one of this days I swear that I'll go downtown just to take pics. But I think I'll do that when it starts getting dark earlier in the evening so that I can get a skyline without smog! I promise. smile
l'art est une sorte de frisson de l'esprit.
Ginnie Hart: Wow, O-P. I like that! Thanks.
  • Julischka
  • butterfly bush
  • 26 Jun 2007, 18:07
You brought out the colours and the surface with the cuttling very well. A profile shot could have been interesting too.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Julia. I never once thought of a profile shot! That would have been cool. Thanks for the idea. For next time. smile
I agree with Julischka: A profile shot would (maybe) have been more interestening. Did there was glass, witch you had to photographe through?
Ginnie Hart: I think that would have been a great idea, Tim, if I had thought of it! There was no glass, so I think I could have had easy access. As I told Julia, thanks for the idea...for the next time. smile
She looks so bored!! Great shot. All the best, Dave
Ginnie Hart: Bored or stressed out. I can't tell which, Dave. Thanks.
I like the angle you captured it from. That seems to be my weakness at times.
Ginnie Hart: What are you saying is your weakness, Busola...lying down to rest or the angle? grin
Your photo almost makes the hand the subject - interesting shot
Ginnie Hart: I hadn't thought about that, Mike, but it was definitely the closest to the camera! smile
  • Ellie
  • 26 Jun 2007, 23:53
What a magnificent piece of art work, my first thought was that it's heavily painted wood, but the more I look the more I think it's plaster rather than wood, is that right do you think?

(will try to backtrack through your other pictures very soon)
Ginnie Hart: No, Ellie, I do believe it's wood. Even though it's not in my book, there are other similar pieces that are wood--walnut, lindenwood, poplar, etc. I especially marvel at how the paint has withstood Time!

Thanks for stopping by. I know you'll be eager for the taxi-driver hat to be off in the next couple days!
I can stay a long time looking at this kind of picture, really well done Ginnie !
Ginnie Hart: She definitely intrigued me, Zeb. smile Thanks.

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