Hart & Soul

05 Jun 2007 698 views
 
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photoblog image Rembrandt's City

Rembrandt's City

Now that I'm back in Amsterdam for two weeks, after a quick weekend in Atlanta, I want to switch gears this week and take you to Leiden, 25 miles (40km) SW of Amsterdam.

Leiden is Rembrandt's birthplace, in 1606, and where he started his painting.  Donica and I took a day-trip there by train a week ago Saturday and enjoyed 5 hours of getting acquainted with the city.

At one point we climbed the city's citadel for great views of the city.  Here you see the Hooglandse Kerk rising high above the surrounding rooftops.  It's the church of St. Pancras, built in the 15th century.  Even from that far away, you can see the rooster on top of the weather vane!  :)

[Today I'm in Amsterdam.]


Rembrandt's City

Now that I'm back in Amsterdam for two weeks, after a quick weekend in Atlanta, I want to switch gears this week and take you to Leiden, 25 miles (40km) SW of Amsterdam.

Leiden is Rembrandt's birthplace, in 1606, and where he started his painting.  Donica and I took a day-trip there by train a week ago Saturday and enjoyed 5 hours of getting acquainted with the city.

At one point we climbed the city's citadel for great views of the city.  Here you see the Hooglandse Kerk rising high above the surrounding rooftops.  It's the church of St. Pancras, built in the 15th century.  Even from that far away, you can see the rooster on top of the weather vane!  :)

[Today I'm in Amsterdam.]


comments (27)

  • Dotun
  • 5 Jun 2007, 00:22
ok, you've got to share the secret to your crisp sepia conversions smile
Ginnie Hart: As in so many things I do, Dotun, when I don't really know the best way, I work by trial and error. I think the pros would laugh!!

Once I do all the tweaking I want in color (like contrast, shadows, sharpening), I THEN totally desaturate it from Hues/Saturation in PS. Then I use the Color/Balance slides to get the color I want (usually a mix of red and yellow--different for every pic). Hopefully that helps. But like I said, it's probably NOT the best way to do it!
  • nev
  • Australia
  • 5 Jun 2007, 01:01
This is beautiful Ginnie. sharp as a tac and i love the different rooflines.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Neal. I probably could have cropped out most of the roofs to give this a better composition, but I love the rooftops of these cities and wanted to give the pic some distace to the church to show how big it is!
Wow, as usual, a great picture in wonderful tones. smile
Ginnie Hart: You're a sweetheart, as always, Kay. Thanks.
  • Ted
  • 5 Jun 2007, 03:40
Whoa! I love the way you've used tones in this photo. It gives it this chaotic look where I can spend some time just trying to pick out the individual buildings.

What are you doing in Amsterdam, may I ask? It seems like you've been there and will continue to be there for a while.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Ted, for stopping by again. That means a lot.

I am retired so I can travel with my domestic partner when she is in Europe over half the year, going back-n-forth every month. She works for a pharmaceutical company in a global company and has an office in Atlanta and this jump-off office here in Amsterdam (which used to be in Hannover, Germany, the last two years). Today she's in Belgium! But we're at least in the same time zone! Thanks for asking. smile
Nice shot Ginnie. I wonder how you get those rich tones in Sepia. Like all others, waiting for the secret to be unveiled smile
Ginnie Hart: Thankyou kindly, Thomas. This is what I told Dotun:

As in so many things I do, when I don't really know the best way, I work by trial and error. I think the pros would laugh!!

Once I do all the tweaking I want in color (like contrast, shadows, sharpening), I THEN totally desaturate it from Hues/Saturation in PS. Then I use the Color/Balance slides to get the color I want (usually a mix of red and yellow--different for every pic). Hopefully that helps. But like I said, it's probably NOT the best way to do it!
  • alex
  • 5 Jun 2007, 05:27
seriously, these are great tones! agree with thomas.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Alex. This one actually surprised me how it came out. It was different from others I've done, even though I did it the same way. Don't know what that was about except it obviously has to do with the original.
A suitable sepia tone which gives a "middle-ages" atmosphere to this picture. Well done Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: Middle ages is a good term for this, Florence. Maybe that's why I like sepia so much with this older architecture. You know me and architecture. smile
How do you get in theses positions to catch this images. Are you friends with spiderman?
Ginnie Hart: HA! When we found the citadel on its little hill, going up on top was a no-brainer, Busola. In 360 degrees around its ramparts, you could take pics of all around the city. And I did. grin
Well done, Ginnie! I was born at Leyden, I used to often visit the town and my kids went to school there. So it is nice to see it in this way.
Ginnie Hart: Are you serious, Wim? I had no idea you were BORN there! I can't believe you didn't tell us that when we saw you. WOW. I hope my pics do you proud. I have a few queued up for the next few days and tomorrow's pic is my favorite. I'm quite sure you can guess what it's of! smile
great architectural photography going on here. I love the sky
Ginnie Hart: The sky was what surprised me here, Ngozi. It turned out different in sepia than I expected. I'm glad you like it. Thanks. smile
Ohh Ginnie, haciendo una comparación con el pic del día 22/05 éste es completamente diferente. Aquí si que aprecio tu trabajo. Al abrir el campo la catedral queda agrandada por el entorno y además el tratamiento que has hecho y esos marcos blancos de los tejados hacen del conjunto algo muy bello! Me gusta smile

Ohh Ginnie, doing a comparison with pic of day 22/05 this one is completely different. Here if that esteem your work. When opening the field the cathedral is enlarged by the surroundings and in addition the treatment that you have done and those white marks to the tile roofs do of the set something very beautiful! I likesmile
Ginnie Hart: HA! I KNEW you'd think about that other church, Jose! grin Isn't that funny. Well, again, I do appreciate your comment and am glad you like how this one came out. It does have a different look, to be sure.
Beautiful shot Ginnie, love the sepia tones...thanks for the tips! Will also be in contact re the selective colouring!!
Ginnie Hart: Awww. Thanks, Bridge. Don't always do as I do, however. I think I tend to go about things in a round-about way. Story of my life. smile
  • paul
  • 5 Jun 2007, 12:24
splendid shot as usual Ginnie - you have a knack of bringing out the best in a building
Ginnie Hart: Very kind words, Paul. I appreciate that.
The sepia really gives the sky something extra
You are a sepia master smile
Ginnie Hart: HA! I'm not sure I'd go that far, Magnus, but I do appreciate the thought. smile
  • Jimbo
  • Dublin, Ireland
  • 5 Jun 2007, 13:47
How have I left it so late adding my voice to this chorus of admiration! Selective colouring and sepia conversion are things I've yet to try. Ginnie's work may well prove to be just the encouragement I need.
Ginnie Hart: It's funny, Jimbo, but I never did any of this till I came to SC. There has been so much inspiration here to try all kinds of things. Watch out because the bug looks like it's heading straight for you. smile
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 5 Jun 2007, 14:11
You got on top here like the rooster. Good for you twose. Keeps the old bones young. Like you love vanes and clocks and stuff i like these rooftop shots. The brown filter contrasts excellent with the white highlights on the dutch buildings. Excellent.

University of Leiden also quite famous. Dutch royalty's most preferred institute of tersiary learning.
Ginnie Hart: You are such a fountain of knowledge, Mr. Louis. I always love hearing from you, wondering what next will come outta your mouth! grin Thank you, kind sir.
  • Ellie
  • 5 Jun 2007, 14:19
This angle puts the whole thing into perspective, with the cathedral towering above all the others around it.

Lovely colour treatment too, now I know how you do it I still don't reckon I'll try because I'm a photoshopaphobic! wink
Ginnie Hart: It really was a whole new world up there, Ellie. You're right about the angle. The height of the church actually took my breath away.

I'm gonna write you about PS. Are you saying you have it??
  • Ruth
  • Michigan, USA
  • 5 Jun 2007, 14:36
Let me echo everyone's praise for the photo. I wonder if Leiden has an ordinance that no building is higher than "x" stories so that the view of the cathedral isn't obscured? It must be great inside with light streaming in those high windows. Reminds me of how Chartres cathedral is so imposing in its village landscape.

It's quite fun to imagine this church being there when the Pilgrims hung out in Leiden before their trek to the New World! Reading Nathaniel Philbrick's "Mayflower" and Leiden at the same time you visited was a nice synchronicity. smile
Ginnie Hart: Awwww. Thanks, Ruth. I know that there ARE ordinances in cities throughout Europe (and in St. Petersburg, where we were last year!) about such things as the height of structures, so that wouldn't surprise me about Leiden.

After reading and hearing from you about Leiden being very specific to the Pilgrims, I've discovered many new things. In a couple days I'll be showing the town hall where Pilgrims who came to America got married before they left on the Mayflower! Talk about history coming alive. smile
Leiden is also where many of the most important discoveries that shaped modern physics were made. It is remarkable that this smallish town played such an important role in many aspects of history.
Ginnie Hart: You are so right, Martin. Their observatory is the second oldest in Europe, behind St. Petersburg's! I had no idea this town was chock full of so much! We just went there because some friends recommended it for a nice day trip, without really telling us why.
  • Suby
  • MK, United Kingdom
  • 5 Jun 2007, 17:50
Like the tone

Suby
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Suby.
  • Mal
  • United Kingdom
  • 5 Jun 2007, 18:07
the church is such a prominant feature of the image Ginnie, yet it blends into it's environment beautifully. I wish the practicing church would be so accomadating! lol

lovely image Ginnie. mal
Ginnie Hart: Better words could not be spoken, Mal. Right on!

Thank you kindly, and WELCOME BACK. smile
  • Julischka
  • the black hole where time disappears
  • 5 Jun 2007, 19:15
This perspective is astonishing. It appears to me flat like a painted picture, one dimensional. Especially if I concentrate on the church. Do you know what I mean?
Interesting effect. I can't stop looking at it. smile
Ginnie Hart: Yes, Julia, I know what you mean, and I thank you kindly!
I like the colour tone in this one, I also think the sky is very nice smile
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Aksel. The sky seemed so strange when I did the conversion--not like normal. So I'm glad you like it. smile
Blimey Ginnie, talk abot frequent flyer!! Wonderful buildings smile
Ginnie Hart: If it weren't for Donica's FF miles, I probably would not be here today. So, yes, thank God for them!

Thanks, as always, for your faithful comments, Chris.
I am loving the perspective and of course the tones
Ginnie Hart: A sweetheart, as always, Shakara! Thanks.
  • Erika T.
  • United Kingdom
  • 6 Jun 2007, 12:02
Wow, this is really nice - it almost looks like a watercolor painting wink
Ginnie Hart: Thanks for stopping by and commenting, Erika. Welcome, again, to SC.
Hi Ginnie, like very much the colortone on this one, it gives really an old postcard aspect !

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for this photo I'm in a constructive critical comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon PowerShot S3 IS
exposure mode program mode
shutterspeed 1/400s
aperture f/4.0
sensitivity unknown
focal length 6.2mm
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