Hart & Soul

28 May 2007 781 views
 
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photoblog image The Bell Gable

The Bell Gable

This is #4 of six canal-house gables here in Amsterdam (NOT the one on the left, silly!).   HA!  So I didn't want to be b-o-r-i-n-g again!  Talk about the new and the old being able to peacefully coexist!  And believe it or not, this sits right across the canal from the Anne Frank House, so every day there are a lot of people from around the world who see this! 

This one is the bell gable that was popular starting from the mid-late 17th century, right after the neck gable was popular.  All kinds of curlicues were added to spruce it up.  Sometimes other things were added (like this cow?!), I see, but this is NOT the norm.  Like I said, I didn't want to be boring.  :)

The other 3 gables thus far, in case you've missed them, are:

       Beak Gable
       Stepped Gable
       Neck Gable

Today is Memorial Day in the USA (when we honor all those who have died in the service of our military), and my sister, Ruth, reminded me that our paternal grandfather fought in the American Civil War (1861-65). Our father was born in 1917 when his father was 70 (and his mother was 47).

[Today I'm in Amsterdam.]


The Bell Gable

This is #4 of six canal-house gables here in Amsterdam (NOT the one on the left, silly!).   HA!  So I didn't want to be b-o-r-i-n-g again!  Talk about the new and the old being able to peacefully coexist!  And believe it or not, this sits right across the canal from the Anne Frank House, so every day there are a lot of people from around the world who see this! 

This one is the bell gable that was popular starting from the mid-late 17th century, right after the neck gable was popular.  All kinds of curlicues were added to spruce it up.  Sometimes other things were added (like this cow?!), I see, but this is NOT the norm.  Like I said, I didn't want to be boring.  :)

The other 3 gables thus far, in case you've missed them, are:

       Beak Gable
       Stepped Gable
       Neck Gable

Today is Memorial Day in the USA (when we honor all those who have died in the service of our military), and my sister, Ruth, reminded me that our paternal grandfather fought in the American Civil War (1861-65). Our father was born in 1917 when his father was 70 (and his mother was 47).

[Today I'm in Amsterdam.]


comments (32)

This is really fantastic....I'm seeing Amsterdam.
Ginnie Hart: Yes, you are, Mary. It's a fantastic city. So much to see everywhere you look.
  • alex
  • 28 May 2007, 01:55
hi ginnie! as you can see, i'm back from getting married in hawaii....just trying to catch up on people's blogs.

is it just me, or does that cow have wings?
Ginnie Hart: Welcome back, Alex. And congratulations on your marriage.

I thought the same thing about that cow until I realized his tail is swung up on his side, for some unknown reason! smile
Es cierto, Amsterdam tiene edificios muy peculiares. TĂș fotografĂ­a es clara y nitida con grandes detalles!

It is certain, Amsterdam has very peculiar buildings. You photography is clear and clear with great details!
Ginnie Hart: I can't tell you how many fascinating structures I find every day, Jose. I could have an entire blog just on the architecture of Amsterdam!
I really love how the new and old co-exist in this photo. Great pick, Ginnie! (Great pic, too.) grin
Ginnie Hart: BTW, this is not usual, to see two disparate structures like this side-by-side here in Amsterdam, at least not in the centrum part of the city. So this really DID catch my eye! Thanks.
Hi Ginnie, here it makes me think of these houses, hotels in the western movie pictures... Funny dog (?) sculpture on the right one.
Ginnie Hart: I think it's a cow, Florence, with his tail swatting the flies. smile
Wow - this is cool architecture. Thanx for these Gable lessons Ginnie smile
Ginnie Hart: You're so welcome, Thomas. I'm hoping they aren't too boring, now that I've started them! smile
  • Judy
  • So Californina - United States
  • 28 May 2007, 07:49
Ginnie - Loving the gables. Will there be a test? These two together are pretty amazing! I think (from my waaaay back farm days) that cows "swish" their tails to move flies or any other bugs that might be bothering them and this cow just got caught in a "swish" pose. Don't worry Ginnie - your pics and notes are NEVER boring!
Ginnie Hart: HA! If there is a test, I'm quite sure you will pass with flying colors! Thank you for assuring me you aren't bored...yet. smile

You are exactly right about that cow. I'm very sure he's swishing his tail!! grin
Wow well seen Ginnie I like the contrast of colors and shapes...
Ginnie Hart: The contrast of shapes is definitely clear here, for sure, Roland. Thanks.
  • Petra
  • 28 May 2007, 08:45
You know Ginnie that i just love those windows in these houses..the ones you have to push up to open them..the original ones have these pulleys with rope and contra-weight.
Would love to have those in my house..smile
Have a nice day Ginnie
Petra
ps have to update you asap...will email you later this week!
Ginnie Hart: I'm giggling over your comment, Petra, because these windows (which I didn't notice until you mentioned it) are like ours in the States. Almost all our windows push up or down and in the olden days had the pulleys, yes!

When we first were in our Germany apartment two years ago, we felt so stupid because we did NOT know how to open the windows. European windows are just unique. I was 60 years old when I first experienced them, which tells you that we DON'T have them in the States!

Anyway, I can see the benefit to both styles. Right now, we're kinda liking the European style. smile

I am soooo ready for your update!
étrange contraste entre moderne et ancien. mais ça ne choque pas
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, O-P!
I like the old and new, side by side, and actually not killing each other - in my opinion.

Is it an optical illusion or are the two houses to the right leaning away from each other.... smile
Ginnie Hart: I think almost every house in Amsterdam leans, Aksel, but some more than others. There are some that have an almost 2-foot lean. I have lots of pics and will have to put one up soon. It's quite unbelievable!

But remember that so much of the city settles because of the fact much of the Netherlands is below sea level. This is a very interesting article about the polderland:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polder
Old & New: Well done! You can see this often in the Netherlands...
Ginnie Hart: Whenever I see it, Tim, I smile. I'm getting used to it when I see it but you don't see it a lot in the centrum area of Amsterdam. smile
Lovely and well-thought-out capture, Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, Bridge. smile
  • Jimbo
  • Dublin, Ireland
  • 28 May 2007, 12:19
I like the way the new build is fairly uncompromising but still manages to respect the traditional approach to design. Am I right in thinking that a practical purpose for these gables is for moving furniture and other large items in and out of the buildings?
Ginnie Hart: Respect is a good word, Jimbo. Now if we all could remember that, maybe we'd have a lot more peaceful coexistence!

Yes, you're right. Those beams coming out of the gables are definitely for hoisting up heavy/bulky items. The staircases inside are very narrow, steep and spiraling.
  • Ruth
  • Michigan, USA
  • 28 May 2007, 13:53
I was wondering the same as Jimbo.

When I look at your photos of Amsterdam, I feel it is a city that invites human habitation. They don't HAVE to beautify with flowers, etc. (though they do, and they look great), because they used their imagination and creativity to design the structures themselves.
Ginnie Hart: As I told Jimbo, Ruth, those beams coming out of the gables are definitely for hoisting up heavy/bulky items. The staircases inside are very narrow, steep and spiraling...just like ours here at the apartment.

There is definitely a LOT of imagination and creativity in this city!
  • Carl
  • Navarre,FL
  • 28 May 2007, 13:59
Now that is a skyline to appreciate!
Amazing glass gable there.
Ginnie Hart: I don't know if the one on the left is considered a gable at all, Carl, but we can pretend. It's NOT one of the 6 I'm in the process of showing here. smile
  • Louis
  • back in South Africa
  • 28 May 2007, 14:56
The one on the left can be a bols gable. This is a phoenetic pun. And Bols brandy is from Petra's part of the world.

Cows do swish their tails at flies, have seen it in hungary. Their cows have huge horns. Trying to capture the animal with the huge horns you become aware of the swishing tail.

Must say it feels strange to sit here and type away. Having a beer with your feet in the Donau was much nicer.

Anyhow, in some vague idea of catching up I viewed your archive in thumbnail format. See you gotta know Ade and Petra. Your pictures are all as great as always. The one that caught my eye was the 2 men and the tree.

Another great picture this one, and well spotted with the old and new sizing each other up.
Ginnie Hart: So glad to see you back, Louis. I really did miss you. In fact, there were a couple of times when I had a question and said, "Where's Louis when we need him?!" smile

I can always count on you to 1) add a bit of humor to the day; and/or 2) add some relevant info that enlightens us all. Thank you for both!
I think that so far this one is my fav. I love the old and new existing together. Jimbo's right, they were built that way to make moving furniture easier. Looking forward to the next one Ginnie.

J
Ginnie Hart: So glad you're enjoying this, Johnny. So am I. smile
  • nev
  • Australia
  • 28 May 2007, 17:19
i wonder wheter they were animists or how the cow got such an elevated position on the building. makes it seem very hindu in an amsterdam sort of way.
Ginnie Hart: Good question, Neal. It's definitely intriguing, to say the least! And very unusual.
Ha! That house on the end reminds me of what they say about men and cars!

Bold and brash versus grace and beauty. Amsterdam seems to have the same kind of planning departments that this country has! The period house makes me think of our Georgian architecture but that was in the 18th Century. Think that's why I like Bath so much.
Ginnie Hart: We could just have a heyday with all this architecture stuff, couldn't we! smile
I love the complementary buildings sitting side by side. Both are unique and beautiful in their own right!
Ginnie Hart: Yes they are, Kay. I totally agree. Thanks.
New meets old and it works so well Ginnie, I wish our architects could be considerate like this!
Ginnie Hart: Yes, Chris. I agree. Thanks.
I really appreciate the juxtaposition of the old and the new. It's a great composition. Very crisp, too.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million, Red Pen.
the skies, the bricks and the green on the left make this picture for me, lovely frame.
Ginnie Hart: You're a sweetheart, Dotun. Thanks.
  • L.Reis
  • Lisbon
  • 28 May 2007, 22:30
Everything looks so clean and neat on its proper place. Amsterdam is a fantastic place. and your pictures have managed to show it in most amazing way.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Lina. Amsterdan truly IS a fantastic place. I'm constantly seeing something new, every day!
  • Ted
  • 28 May 2007, 22:32
The contrast between the old and new is pretty stark. I like the mix. I'm amazed that your grandfather was in the American Civil War. That is simply astounding.
Ginnie Hart: You were the first, Ted, to mention something about my grandfather serving in the Civil War. I'm not sure anyone else really "got" it. It really is quite astounding.

Anyway, thanks, as always, for your comment.
  • Les Auld
  • Southport UK
  • 28 May 2007, 23:00
More Dutch architectural slendour, keep it up, and the new seems to be quite sympathetic to the old style, not too much of a contrast.
Ginnie Hart: Dutch architectural splendor is absolutely right, Les. Thanks.
  • Neil Tandy
  • Johannesburg, South Africa, currently Wales
  • 28 May 2007, 23:46
Wonderfully crisp and lit again Gramma Ginn. Very nice indeed. Kind regards, Neil.-x-
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million, Neil!
  • Ellie
  • 29 May 2007, 00:43
It's such a nice way, isn't it, of making the end of a building look pretty. I do like the way they've at least tried to make the new blend in a bit with the old.

Interesting about your father. Mine was born in 1906, I arrived quite late in his life. Our children's equals in the generation tree are all old enough to be their parents! Family history brings history alive, and makes is so relevant, doesn't it?
Ginnie Hart: You are so right about the Family Tree. I don't think most people really "get it" about my grandfather serving in our Civil War. That's almost unheard of for my generation!

Thanks, as always, for your kind, thoughtful comment, Ellie.
  • Julischka
  • the black hole where time disappears
  • 29 May 2007, 07:47
Beautiful! Modern and traditional go together very well.

Thanks for sharing your family history. That's very interesting!
Ginnie Hart: I bet we could sit around and tell all kinds of stories about our collective family histories. And who knows, we might all be surprised at how many of our forebears from around the world actually crossed paths in their lifetimes! smile

Thanks, Julia.
I didn't imagine a so wide diversity in architecture in Amsterdam, I love to visit the town days after days with you !
Ginnie Hart: Awwww. Thanks, Zeb. smile
hehe ... you and your gables ginnie smile.... nice!smile
Ginnie Hart: HA! You can't take them out of me. grin

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