Hart & Soul

22 May 2007 728 views
 
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photoblog image De Krijtberg

De Krijtberg

One day last trip I went to the cafe on the 6th floor of the Metz & Co department store not far from our Amsterdam apartment.  The tourist books say that it is one of the best places for good pics of the canal ring below.

Well, it's also where I got this pic of one of Amsterdam's Catholic churches, De Krijtberg, which means Chalk Mountain.  It was designed in 1883 by Alfred Tepe, with an elegant, twin-steepled Neo-Gothic façade. 

This is the back of the church, of course.  The front faces the Singel canal.  In the foreground rooftops, can you pick out the beak gable?  :)

Addendum:  Wim and I have been going back-n-forth about why this church means 'Chalk Mountain.'  He says:  "I googled the Krijtberg: http://www.krijtberg.nl/. They say that there were Roman Catholic services on that spot on the Singel from 1654 in a house called 'Crijtberg' [a warehouse that presumably stored chalk]. The official religion in the 17th century was protestatism and R.C. services were more or less illegal. The church was being built in 1881 and restored between 1979 and 2001; it is dedicated to St. Francis Xaverius."

[Today I'm in Amsterdam.]


De Krijtberg

One day last trip I went to the cafe on the 6th floor of the Metz & Co department store not far from our Amsterdam apartment.  The tourist books say that it is one of the best places for good pics of the canal ring below.

Well, it's also where I got this pic of one of Amsterdam's Catholic churches, De Krijtberg, which means Chalk Mountain.  It was designed in 1883 by Alfred Tepe, with an elegant, twin-steepled Neo-Gothic façade. 

This is the back of the church, of course.  The front faces the Singel canal.  In the foreground rooftops, can you pick out the beak gable?  :)

Addendum:  Wim and I have been going back-n-forth about why this church means 'Chalk Mountain.'  He says:  "I googled the Krijtberg: http://www.krijtberg.nl/. They say that there were Roman Catholic services on that spot on the Singel from 1654 in a house called 'Crijtberg' [a warehouse that presumably stored chalk]. The official religion in the 17th century was protestatism and R.C. services were more or less illegal. The church was being built in 1881 and restored between 1979 and 2001; it is dedicated to St. Francis Xaverius."

[Today I'm in Amsterdam.]


comments (27)

It's impressive. But why Chalk Mountain?
Ginnie Hart: I haven't the foggiest, Red Pen! Good question. I've tried to find out but no success thus far. Where's Louis when we need him???
lovely shot!
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, KS.
  • Ted
  • 22 May 2007, 03:34
Beautiful tones, Ginnie. I've never been to Amsterdam and I'm very jealous that you're there. You must be having so much fun.
Ginnie Hart: Amsterdam is a fabulous city, Ted. My wish for you is that you can visit it some day. And if so, I hope I am here to show you around. And bring Martin with you! smile
Agree with Ted. Lovely sepia tones which well suits your subject. Where were you to take this one ? on top of a tree ? smile
Ginnie Hart: HAHAHA! No, Florence, I was in the cafe on the 6th floor of the Metz & Co department store. grin But I'm quite sure you'd rather picture me up in a tree somewhwere. Actually, I'm a tree climber and would love that.
Nice charm on this shot - feels like the cover of an old book.
Ginnie Hart: Awww. That's special, Thomas. Thank you.
Hi Ginnie,
I love pictures of rooftops...European style. And this is exactly that. What a lovely picture! I will have to study it more to find the beak gable. I know I can find it! Have a wonderful day in beautiful Amsterdam!
Ginnie Hart: I love the rooftops of Europe, too, Kay, which is exactly why I HAD to leave them in. I'm expecting someone to say I should have cropped it more but I just couldn't!

For all I know, there may be 3 beak gables in this shot but the one I'm referring to is the light one slightly to the right of center. The one to the left may also be one but that's when I start getting confused as to what's a gable and what's not.
Nice picture and good sepia work Ginnie. It work's for me !
Ginnie Hart: Glad it works for you, Roland. Thanks. smile
This is great . Sell it to the tourist board !!!
Ginnie Hart: HA! I think I need an agent. Wanna be mine, Shakara?
Lovely shot Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million, Bridge.
the tourist book is right Ginnie!nice!
Ginnie Hart: You're so kind, Nicola. Wouldn't that be fun if it happened. grin
A very nice view, Ginny! I see a lot of this church when on the Spui on Sundays, but never from this angle.
Ginnie Hart: I bet you see a lot of Amsterdam, Wim, when you're here on Sundays. I should start asking you when I have questions. So, do YOU know why this church is called 'Chalk Mountain?' We're trying to figure that out.

Thanks again for leaving a comment. Donica was looking at your etchings before work this morning and has found another she really likes! It's "The Prinsengracht with the Westerkerk," a view that's just a couple blocks away from our apartment, so we see it often! smile
  • Petra
  • 22 May 2007, 09:37
[email protected] comment...actually i can imagine you climbing a tree just because you want to take a photo...lol
Petra
Ginnie Hart: You know me well, Petra. Busted again! grin
  • Ruth
  • Michigan, USA
  • 22 May 2007, 12:12
All those spires and roof peaks (and no, I didn't remember your lesson about the beak gable :|) are reaching up up up, and it's quite a sight from this rooftop perspective. Beautiful!
Ginnie Hart: Don't you just love it when perspective changes everything! I'm guessing there's a good little sermonette there. smile

Thanks, Ruth!
Nice shot Ginnie and love the treatment you've given it.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Bernie!
This is an interesting shot, Ginnie. To me the Neo Gothic architects never quite attained the same level of uplifting lightness as their earlier counterparts. This shot emphasizes this because the church is a dark focal point mired in the mundane houses around it. All of this seems very appropriate for a church built during the industrial revolution.
Ginnie Hart: I would love to sit down with you some day, Martin, and have you teach me everything you know about architecture! Seriously. I LOVE the stuff but usually haven't a clue what any of it is called, or why. What you have written here is so very fascinating! Thanks.
  • Dave W in Dublin
  • 22 May 2007, 14:24
Hi Ginnie, that's lovely. The weird thing is, with only a few very minor things you could wipe out with Photo Shop the seen and the sepis tones means you could be looking at a spring day in the 1940's.
Ginnie Hart: That is definitely the beauty of our photo-manipulation tools, Dave, isn't it! Thanks.
In the background (at the horizon) you can see the modern-parts of the city. ''Rotterdam'' is an almost new city. The built the city again up after '45.

Nice picture, Ginnie smile . Also thanks that you have visited my blog, and left some comment(s) wink .
Ginnie Hart: '45 was the year I was born, Tim, so I always pay attention when I see what happened that year! smile

Thanks for stopping by and commenting!
I love your choice of colour editing here Ginne. That's a sharp roof top, ouch! grin
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Fehinti!
Excellent as usual Ginnie. I discovered Petra yesterday and you guys are awesome.
Ginnie Hart: Awwww. So sweet, Busola. smile
I was taking pictures of a cathedral recently too. I can see lots of church spires here. Nice photo with the old-fashioned look.
Ginnie Hart: I collect the spires, Mary, just like clocks and weather vanes. smile
It's always a pleasure to visit your blog Ginnie
I get to see new things and learn about them smile
Ginnie Hart: You're such a sweetheart, Magnus. The pleasure is mutual.
Wonderful view from there Ginnie smile
Ginnie Hart: At first I didn't know this was YOU, Chris. So, what does the 'iw' mean? Inquiring minds and all. smile
  • Ellie
  • 22 May 2007, 23:04
I've been sitting here looking at this picture for the last five minutes or more, and I keep seeing things I want to mention. The pointy spires, the shiny weather vane, the new buildings in the foreground ... all so much, and it all comes together in a very well turned out picture.

Thanks Ginnie, keep sharing your world please, I'm enjoying every minute of it. smile
Ginnie Hart: I know what you mean, Ellie. When I look at a pic like this I always see something I haven't a clue about, so off I go again to figure it out. I'm lucky to be here long enough to do that.

Your words are so very kind, Ellie. I'll keep showing my world as long as you keep showing yours! smile
I'm fascinated that you get to be in Atlanta Amsterdam and Hannover. That's so cool and we reap the benefits!
Ginnie Hart: Not so much Hannover any more, Josie, except for if I visit once a year now. So it's Atlanta and Amsterdam now! And since we come back-n-forth all the time throughout the year, I try to let you know where I am on any given day. I'm glad you feel that you are reaping my benefits as well. Thanks for saying that.
Te voy a ser sincero, Ginnie, como siempre. De esta foto, me gusta el tratamiento sepia... pero no me dice nada más. Quizás desde otro punto de vista... Tú eres una gran fotógrafa de edificios y aquí no veo tú trabajo !! wink Estoy en lo cierto?
(P.D.: No he leido el texto)

I am going to you to be sincere, Ginnie, like always. Of this photo, I like the treatment sepia... but she does not say to me nothing else. Perhaps from another point of view... You are a great photographer of buildings and here I do not see you work! wink I am in the certain thing?
P.D.: I have not leido the text)
Ginnie Hart: Thank you for being sincere, Jose. I would want/expect nothing else from you. I do think it's interesting when we feel things a certain way the day we work on a pic. I wonder if I would have processed this differently on another day? Maybe. And perhaps that day it would be more to your liking. smile
Really nice church ! A great idea to process in sépiah tone !
Ginnie Hart: Wow. I didn't realize I had some replying to do. A belated thanks, Zeb.
  • Julischka
  • the black hole where time disappears
  • 24 May 2007, 16:56
I really like this nostalgic look. smile
Ginnie Hart: Another belated thanks, Julia.

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