Hart & Soul

08 May 2007 798 views
 
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photoblog image Statue of Liberty

Statue of Liberty

One of the most recognizable American icons in the world stands in the NY Harbor on Liberty Island, welcoming all who live or visit here.  She represents liberty and escape from oppression.

She's made of pure copper on a frame of steel, except for the flame that's coated in gold leaf.  The statue itself is 151 feet tall (46 meters), and, with the foundation, totals 305 feet tall (93 meters).

She was given to the United States by France in 1886 as a gesture of friendship between the two nations in honor of our centennial.  Thank you, France!

I didn't know what to do to keep this from "been there, done that," so I desaturated it and then selective-colored the statue alone.  It was MY first time to see it up close and personal.  Pretty powerful, I must say.

[Today I'm in Atlanta.]


Statue of Liberty

One of the most recognizable American icons in the world stands in the NY Harbor on Liberty Island, welcoming all who live or visit here.  She represents liberty and escape from oppression.

She's made of pure copper on a frame of steel, except for the flame that's coated in gold leaf.  The statue itself is 151 feet tall (46 meters), and, with the foundation, totals 305 feet tall (93 meters).

She was given to the United States by France in 1886 as a gesture of friendship between the two nations in honor of our centennial.  Thank you, France!

I didn't know what to do to keep this from "been there, done that," so I desaturated it and then selective-colored the statue alone.  It was MY first time to see it up close and personal.  Pretty powerful, I must say.

[Today I'm in Atlanta.]


comments (38)

  • Ron Shavreen
  • 2 months west of retirement!
  • 8 May 2007, 00:21
Love this Ginnie. Sombre and brooding; a serious subject with a treatment that brings out its intensity, symbolism and significance. You're doing some clever stuff with phtotshop and this one works really well.
Ginnie Hart: Your words mean a lot to me, Ron. Thank you kindly!
Very nice job with the processing. You've made the photo quite interesting and unique.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Red Pen.
OooOOhoHhooOOh Ginnie. This is excellent. Ive got something similar today. Although not as masterfully done as yours. I likes a lot.
Ginnie Hart: Yoiu're a sweetheart, Busola. Thanks.
Hi Ginnie,
I love this one the best, altho those bridges are hard to beat! The selective coloring you did is meaningful...it focuses on what our Liberty lady stands for...Hurrah!
Ginnie Hart: Thank you for your kind words, Kay. I'm guessing this statue represents far more than any of us realize. I'm suddenly in awe of its history for us here in the States...as well as the world. She really HAS been an icon of Liberty for the entire world, I think!
This statue has been on my to-do list for decades and this shot has moved it up on the priority list. Nice work!
Ginnie Hart: I look forward to the day, Martin, when we'll see YOUR pics of this city. I'm guessing everyone's perspective through the lens would be so different, which is truly the beauty of photography!
I agree about it being a powerful symbol. I've only seen it once from this perspective, too. Very memorable. I love the color selection. Really draws your attention to Lady Liberty. I'm sure that many who journeyed across the Atlantic saw her this way too...her beauty so vibrant that everything else paled in comparison.
Ginnie Hart: As I've been thinking about the history, Mad, and all the people who really DID see this as their symbol of freedom, I have been quite in awe today. Thanks for your kind words. I think all of us in the States have been affected by this statue in our recent/distant past!
very powerful ginnie. nice choice in selective colouring, she really stands out.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Genevieve. I always appreciate your comments!
  • Julischka
  • the centre of EU
  • 8 May 2007, 07:22
Very nice composition and colour work. Great job!
I've seen the statue once, her twin in Paris. wink
Ginnie Hart: I haven't see her twin, Julia, and am not really sure I knew she had one. Hmmm. I'll have to check that out ifever I'm in Paris again.

Thanks!
You have done a really wonderful job with this one Ginnie. I almost wished that I could see the lady in person some day! Well done!!
Ginnie Hart: Maybe you can/will, DD. I'm 61, so truly it's never too late!
Our Liberty is not that huge.... we scarcely see her on french postcards, I don't why... anyway, yours is impresssive and I wish I could see her one day or another. Thanks for this image Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: I didn't even know Paris had her twin, Florence, until Julia mentioned it. Hmmm. Now I need to go look that up! Maybe we'll both swap images one of these days. smile
Ah my Lady! When I was a kid we had a school trip to the statute and back then we had a chance to go up into the torche. It is my understanding now that you can only walk up to the crown. I've seen the smaller lady in Paris and although it's just as stunning because of it's size it's not as powerful. I like the selective coloring you've given her, but for me full color or not she reminds me of home and that's all that matters. So thank you Ginnie for that.

J
Ginnie Hart: I think I heard about that, Johnny--only going up to the crown now. I think that happened awhile back. So glad I could give you fond memories of home. I dedicate this entire series to YOU!
Love your treatment Ginnie. A fine composition with the people to the fore and buildings to the right to give scale and context. Love it.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks for mentioning the scale, PP. I realized only later how important that was to the pic. She's humongous!
brings back memores of my 2002-trip to NYC
Ginnie Hart: Glad for the memories, Chantal. smile
Nice... very nice, there's definitely a feelof freedom attached to it. smile
Ginnie Hart: I think this is one of those icons indelibly imprinted on our nation's psyche! Thanks, Ade.
  • nev
  • Australia
  • 8 May 2007, 11:24
very nice work ginnie. i like the framing of the lady
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Neal.
  • Petra
  • 8 May 2007, 12:03
Great one Ginnie..i see a difference in your photo's lately...Like itsmile
Petra
Ginnie Hart: Hmmm. We'll have to talk about that when we see each other, Petra...how we see our pics changing/evolving. smile Thanks.
Oh, nice Ginnie, very good color work and composition.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, sir!
An icon that you've captured very well.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million, Mary.
Una fotografía típica, pero con una atmósfera triste. Es interesante, Ginnie! Me gusta smile

A typical photography, but with a sad atmosphere. He is interesting, Ginnie! I like smile
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Jose. It seemed appropriate that it was a drizzly day!
Well processed Ginnie - did you manage to visit the Statue?
Ginnie Hart: Sad to say, Bernie, but NO. We only had time to see her up close from a little tour-boat ride. I was actually thankful for that much. Maybe next time we can go up inside her and look out on the world as she sees it!
  • Dotun
  • 8 May 2007, 14:17
Ginnie, you are killing me with these NYC shots...arggghhh. I am almost tempeted to take a trip...nice one here, love the color seperation.
Ginnie Hart: Ha! You're gonna just get up and go one of these weekends, Dotun. I can see it now. smile
  • Aussie
  • Queensland Austrailia
  • 8 May 2007, 14:29
I love the selective colour. I've been trying to decide on a place to holiday in2008 and I must say you are tempting me.
Ginnie Hart: We can swap countries, Aussie, because we're planning to visit Sydney next year! smile
  • Carl
  • Navarre,Florida
  • 8 May 2007, 14:36
Hushed ooohh!
Powerful and symbolic,looks like a real storm is brewing around her.
Ginnie Hart: It was a drizzly day, Carl, which somehow seemed appropriate. I wonder how often she stands there trying to remind us of Freedom! So many people in the world, including the States, still don't have it!
  • mal
  • 8 May 2007, 15:32
your processing choices have given the scene a powerful sense of drama Ginnie, any political motivation in the selections of treatment? Are you being a little rebelious today Ginnie! lol - lovely image. mal
Ginnie Hart: The questions you ask, Mal! grin

Well, I must admit that I have lots of conflict when I see this statue and what she's supposed to represent. So many people in our country (let alone the world) still do not have some of our basic freedoms. I happen to fall into that group some of the time, and yet still feel very lucky. I really feel for those less fortunate than I.

Anyway, we can definitely be rebellious in our pics some of the time, can't we, and fool some of the people....but never you. smile
  • Ellie
  • 8 May 2007, 16:05
It's lovely Ginnie, the picture is almost spine-tinglingly emotional. The selective colouring works so very well with the lighter statue almost rising out of the darker surroundings. A beacon of hope, a good luck charm.

It makes me remember reading of emigrants breaking down in tears when they first saw the statue, and how the first person on a ship to see it was supposed to be especially lucky in their new life. I wonder if it still applies, now people most travel by air?
Ginnie Hart: Even by air, Ellie, if we're lucky, we can see her down below from the airplane window. But yes, there is so much emotional history with this icon. I'm guessing we in the States are more indelibly bonded to it than we realize!

In response to Mal's question about if I was a bit "rebellious" in posting this pic, I said, "I must admit that I have lots of conflict when I see this statue and what she's supposed to represent. So many people in our country (let alone the world) still do not have some of our basic freedoms. I happen to fall into that group some of the time, and yet still feel very lucky. I really feel for those less fortunate than I."
I like your colour work too smile I can almost see you getting even closer to the statue, do the same selective-colour thing but this time only let the flame be in colour....
Ginnie Hart: Actually, Aksel, I have several pics that are very close-up (because of my 12x optical zoom) and had a hard decision as to which pic I'd post today. As you see, I opted for this one, but maybe another day I'll post a close-up. And selectng just the flame for color is a good idea! I'll remember that! smile
très belle photo
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, O-P.
She is really something special
Nice work on this Ginnie
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million, Magnus.
good choice on selective colouring...makes it even more powerful...
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Sam!
  • Monika
  • Londres
  • 8 May 2007, 18:51
Very nice effect smile I have tried it too (http://www.monika.shutterchance.com/photoblog/56891.htm ) Do you think both figures, the statue and horserider, are made from the same material? Colour is the same and both made in France! smile
I love the small detail of fire in the torch, just brilliant idea! Great job Ginnie, very nice capture!
Ginnie Hart: I LOVED your pic from the link. Monika. That's a most interesting thought that maybe they're both of the same material. Who knows! Maybe.

Thanks a million for your comment.
  • paul
  • 8 May 2007, 19:20
fantastic picture Ginnie. It is hard to make a picture of such a well known landmark stand out but this works very well.

My one chance to take a picture of this iconic view was a wash out - too much mist and it was before I had a decent camera sad This makes me want to go back
Ginnie Hart: Go back, Paul, and show us your pics! They'd be fabulous, I know!!! In the meantime, thanks for your comment.
  • chunter
  • Salisbury, Wiltshire. UK
  • 8 May 2007, 20:09
Well there's nothing wrong with your compositional technique or your eye for a good presentation. well done.

I've never been to the Big Apple so have never seen this or any of its other famous landmarks, other than in the American films we see so much of over here.
Ginnie Hart: It's like YOUR cities, Colin, which I've never seen except through your eyes/lens! Sounds like a good swap. smile
  • Ruth
  • Michigan, USA
  • 8 May 2007, 20:38
I like seeing her from this angle the best. Lovely shot and composition, oh, and pp treatment.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, Sweethart!
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 9 May 2007, 00:24
An excellent picture of miss liberty
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Louis.
An absolute beauty..
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Shakara.
Ginnie

Nicely done. It works. Bravo!

See Photoshop is not that hard. smile
Ginnie Hart: HA! This part of PS is fun and easy. I love it, John. It's other stuff I need to work on. smile

Thanks for stopping by and commenting.
Alan and I visited here a few years ago. I was really surprised by how Small the statue of liberty is...you expect it to be so much bigger.
Ginnie Hart: Actually, David, it had the opposite feel for me up close. Did you see how small the people werre in the pic? It does seem much smaller from Manhattan, for sure.
Photographicly this is a very nicely composed shot, good use of balance and positive vs. negative space, very well done. As for the subject and the info. you give, outstanding. I hope to visit someday soon and shots like this inspire me.
Ginnie Hart: Your words are very kind, PM. Thank you! If you do visit some day soon,I know your shots will be phenomenal.

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for this photo I'm in a constructive critical comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon PowerShot S3 IS
exposure mode program mode
shutterspeed 1/320s
aperture f/4.0
sensitivity unknown
focal length 15.2mm
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