Hart & Soul

17 Apr 2007 661 views
 
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photoblog image What They're Known For

What They're Known For

Yes, I know the Romans are known for many things but one thing in particular, which you can see at the Great Bath, is this aqueduct.  "An aqueduct is an artificial (human-made) channel that is constructed to convey water from one location to another."

The Roman Empire fell a long time ago, but some things remain that we really do owe to them.  According to Wiki, their aqueducts "were among the greatest engineering feats of the ancient world, and set a standard not equaled for over a thousand years after the fall of Rome.  Many cities still maintain and use the ancient aqueducts for their water supply even today."

This ends my series on Bath, England, from February 24th!

[Today I fly home to Atlanta from Amsterdam while Donica flies to India!]


What They're Known For

Yes, I know the Romans are known for many things but one thing in particular, which you can see at the Great Bath, is this aqueduct.  "An aqueduct is an artificial (human-made) channel that is constructed to convey water from one location to another."

The Roman Empire fell a long time ago, but some things remain that we really do owe to them.  According to Wiki, their aqueducts "were among the greatest engineering feats of the ancient world, and set a standard not equaled for over a thousand years after the fall of Rome.  Many cities still maintain and use the ancient aqueducts for their water supply even today."

This ends my series on Bath, England, from February 24th!

[Today I fly home to Atlanta from Amsterdam while Donica flies to India!]


comments (25)

Looks like a scene in Lord of the rings. I think its the end of it. OoooooOHh Ginnie
Ginnie Hart: HA! I think you may be right, Busola. I like that thought.
  • Martin
  • USA
  • 17 Apr 2007, 00:33
This is a little aqueduct! The one that fed water to Cologne from the Eifel was 60 miles long and dates back to AD 80. They managed to have it slope down at a constant gentle grade through rather mountainous territory. Modern day civil engineers would have a hard time accomplishing this. There is quite a bit of it left even today and various hiking trails follow sections of it. It is well worth checking out if you are going back to Germany. Sorry for the long rambling post.
Ginnie Hart: You are so right, Martin. Large or small, they had it down pat. You can ramble any time you want, BTW! smile
very lovely ginnie. i like the choice of framing and shade of black and white. did you darken it?
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Genevieve. No, I didn't darken it. That one stone in particular was already pretty dark and the water, remember, is a yucky green!
It's a fascinating subject, They also built one that ended at Montpellier. It too was on a huge scale, way up in the air (at the Montpellier end anyway) and gently sloped to assist flow.

Excellent image Ginnie, the tone is perfect as is your compostion.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, PP. I bet there are aqueducts all over Europe that we can pinpoint to these Romans!
Very nice tones, Ginnie. I love the detail and all of the info you put into this photo series. Very educational!
Ginnie Hart: You so kind, Kay. I appreciate you enthusiasm. )
Safe journey back. I like the treatment on this. Brings E300 to mind.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million, Etomi. I'm actually in the airport lounge as we speak. smile
Thank you for sharing this pic and the great piece of info with it. Have a safe flight back home Ginnie smile
Ginnie Hart: Thank you so much, Thomas. I'm in the airport lounge as we speak. I came with Donica early and had about 3 hours to "waste." smile
  • alex
  • clean apartment in boise, idaho
  • 17 Apr 2007, 05:20
been enjoying this series ginnie, thanks for posting it. safe travels!
Ginnie Hart: I appreciate your travel wishes, Alex. I'm in the airport lounge as we speak and will board my plane momentarily. Thanks for your comment.
Ah Nice Ginnie ! Well catched and well worked too !
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Sir Roland!
  • Louis
  • 17 Apr 2007, 07:59
Great picture Ginnie - there is so much oldness about it and the mono fits in.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Louis, as always
Ginnie hitting the right spots once again . Nice !!!!!!!
Ginnie Hart: HA! You're a sweetheart, Shakara.
great toning and nice detail...sad to have u leave the uk...
Ginnie Hart: Well, I left the UK back in February so I did at least extend it a bit longer on SC, Sam. I have a few more pics from that visit to throw in some day. smile
what a good photo for sepia...
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Chantal. I thought so. smile
  • Ruth
  • Michigan, USA
  • 17 Apr 2007, 10:32
I love this shot. The foreground details and perspective. Yummy!

4 more days!!!! Well, 5 if you count today. Well, 4 1/2 if you count just a half day Saturday.

grin
Ginnie Hart: Counting the days as well, Ruth! Down to 3 now!!! smile

BTW, could you please let me know if you get this reply in an e-mail. I used to get a little message that popped up when I sent a reply but it hasn't happened in a couple of days and I wonder if I inadvertently did something to mess it up. Or maybe SC tweaked something?
  • zOOm
  • 17 Apr 2007, 11:28
Quite fascinating to realize we still have the possibility to see their passage on earth !!!
Ginnie Hart: Isn't that the truth, Florence. Their empire collapsed but their contribution carries on!
wonderful place ginnie
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Nicola.
  • Ellie
  • 17 Apr 2007, 15:04
Nice and interesting angle Ginnie and more of that superb detail too.

I always think of aqueducts as being huge things on arches rather than this little one wink

Hope your journey today passes without a hitch.
Ginnie Hart: That's exactly what I think of, Ellie, when I think of aqueducts! Way up overhead, like railroad trestles!

And thanks for your journeying wishes. It was a trip without any hassle whatsoever, and particularly fast, in that I had no transfer. That felt so strange. But, yes, I'm back home safe-n-sound. Thanks.
  • Deb
  • 17 Apr 2007, 15:35
Have a safe trip home, Ginnie! I've enjoyed your photos so much...thank you for sharing them!
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Deb. The trip was without hassle and seemed quite fast, in that I had no transfer (you can never fly directly to Hannover from Atlanta, so I always had to stop somewhere else first).
Nice composition. Iike the way you can see some of the details on the dark side of the stone. Interesting reading too smile
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million, Aksel.
  • diani
  • 17 Apr 2007, 16:26
Me like! Great pic, it makes me want to timetravel!
Ginnie Hart: I know what you mean, Diani. And BTW, welcome to SC!
well taken, I love the tones.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Dotun.
  • Julischka
  • the centre of EU
  • 17 Apr 2007, 19:56
I like this in b/w and the angle you've chosen.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Julia!
Ginnie, great shots and presentation of Ancient Bath. Adore your work it's inspiring.
Ginnie Hart: Your words are very kind, Olayiwola. Thank you.
  • chris p
  • Heard the first cuckoo today!
  • 17 Apr 2007, 22:41
What did the Romans ever do for us? I'm off in Python again, sorry Ginnie grin Fine shot by the way smile
Ginnie Hart: HA! You can go "off in Python" any time you want, Chris. grin
Wonderful !!!!!!!
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Zeb!!!!!!!

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