Hart & Soul

03 Mar 2007 798 views
 
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photoblog image In Other Words

In Other Words

This is gonna sound crazy to you UKers.  But when something is just a tad wee bit "different," it catches my eye.  In the States, we have the same shape but it says YIELD.  Check Wiki out.

I saw this sign everywhere last weekend while in London.

Be careful as you're out-n-about this Saturday.  Yield when you need to.  Give Way, too!
Have a great weekend.  Stay safe.


In Other Words

This is gonna sound crazy to you UKers.  But when something is just a tad wee bit "different," it catches my eye.  In the States, we have the same shape but it says YIELD.  Check Wiki out.

I saw this sign everywhere last weekend while in London.

Be careful as you're out-n-about this Saturday.  Yield when you need to.  Give Way, too!
Have a great weekend.  Stay safe.


comments (14)

  • Ellie
  • 3 Mar 2007, 01:42
Aha, that'll be the 'highwayman influence' .. yield is more like 'give up' or 'give in' here, not take your turn. Isn't it interesting how language is so different?

I'm just wondering about the little picture that's been attached to the sign, I wonder if it's one of those that festoon phone boxes in the city? wink
Ginnie Hart: English is not always English, is it, Ellie! That's so funny. But at least you have claim to the KING'S English! smile

I was wondering about that sticker myself. Anywhere you can stick one seems to be fair play all around the world.
Trust the Brits to come up with a wonky way of saying Yield. smile And the Germans must still be thinking about how to fit 'Vorfahrt Achten!' on their signs. If you find a yield sign with text in Germany, please bring back a picture!
Ginnie Hart: LOL, Martin. I'll have to look for that here in Germany. Haven't seen it yet. smile
Nice photo! Well, here in Mumbai no one believes in Giving Way or Yielding. Every vehicle tries to occupy whatever space they find on the road, and so do the pedestrians.

If we have to have some similar sign here, it would be Squeeze in! wink
Ginnie Hart: That sounds just like Mexico, Kedar! Exactly. Squeeze in! We all can fit. Lots of hand motioning to communicate the fitting-in part. smile
  • Mal
  • 3 Mar 2007, 07:43
Everyone ignores the sign anyway Ginnie! You did a great job of tagging it with one of your images though!! Hee hee smile Mal
Ginnie Hart: Oh Man, Mal. I'd hate to think that they don't pay attntion because you have us poor tourists who naturally look the opposite direction for any on-coming traffic. Thank God the streets in London say Look Left/Right. Even so, we still look the opposite way first. sad
Ahah ! I think you (UKers) are globally more polite than us !! We also have this sign, but nothing's written, we must think - not always easy :-, or not always able to... smile
Have a great w-e Ginnie !
Ginnie Hart: HA! Upside-down triangles mean YIELD/Give Way. Or just plain ole pay attention! smile Thanks, Florence.
Street signs are interesting the world over. Nice clear sharp representation.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million, Chris, for stopping by and commenting. smile
Plenty of signs in this country Ginnie - too many for some - it can be very confusing on some roads now!!! Regards, Chris
Ginnie Hart: And in busy cities like London, I'm sure it can be very complicated! Glad it's not just us foreigners that have the problems! smile
  • Ruth
  • Michigan, USA
  • 3 Mar 2007, 13:07
I like what Kedar Sule wrote. smile Peter commented on the politeness of Europeans after his recent trip. Such as, if someone wants to sit at table with you in a restaurant, they say "may we join you?" Here in the States we might just say, "can we sit here?" More genteel elsewhere if you ask me. I do think "give way" is somehow more polite. But maybe it's just perception!

Oh, and while I'm on the subject, when Lesley went to British school in Istanbul, we got a note home from Teacher asking to send along a "jumper" to school with her next day. And what the heck is that, we asked??? I don't even remember how we figured out it was a cardigan sweater. (No doubt Brits have no idea what a cardigan is . . .)
Ginnie Hart: HA! You've sure gotten a response from your cardigan story, Ruth. Make sur eyou came back to read the comments.

English is such a complicated language the world over. I would love to hear your stories from the English Dept. there at MSU!
Very interesting its photography. I like. Excuse my English but it is not good. Many Greetings

Ismael smile
Ginnie Hart: You are so kind, Ismael, to comment, and your English is absolutely better than fine! Thanks for stopping by.
  • Neil Tandy
  • Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • 3 Mar 2007, 18:59
Hi Gramma Ginn. The signs here are also tagged "yield", but everyone ignores them as much as they do "stop" street signs and to a lesser degree, red traffic lights, (especially the minibus taxis). Just a quick aside to Ruth's comment, if "you would not mind awfully" mentioning it, the "cardigan" is in fact named after a Brit - the Earl of Cardigan. He was a bit before my time, but I do remeber the mention of him in historical trivia down the years. Oh yes, nice pic by the way!! many kind regards, Neil.
Ginnie Hart: I have a feeling Ruth was dripping with sarcasm, knowing her, so I've told her to come back and read the added comments. smile I have a feeling some cities/countries are more strict than others about their signs. Most of us get away with murder, I'm sure.
Your sister is so funny, the Brits do know what a cardigan is as they were invented here well Scotland anyway. Nice subject to open up a discussion, street signs, would never have thought of that one. How about the way you guys can turn right on a red light !!!! When ever I go home and drive that one thing scares me to death !
Ginnie Hart: I have a feeling Ruth qas dripping with sarcasm and have told t=her to make sure she comes back to read the comments. She'll get a kick outta that. smile

And yes, even we in the States have to pay attention to the "turn right on a red light" because not every state allows it. Talk about confusing!
  • Ruth
  • Michigan, USA
  • 3 Mar 2007, 23:02
Ah, it was only wishful thinking that Brits would be as ignorant as I was. No such luck, and yes, just a little good natured intercultural sarcasm. Hehe. The Earl of Cardigan and I go way back . . .
Ginnie Hart: HA! I knew you'd get a kick outta the added comments, Ruth. smile
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 3 Mar 2007, 23:18
Ah the topic of english. In my learned opinion, english is only spoken by the english. The scots speak the brogue, americans = american, australians have mates everywhere, in SA we speak saffish (south african english).
Now comes the meaning of yield - yield could mean profit, the result of the harvest and just to give way, give up or some other meanings as well. In the traffic sense you are asked to relinquish your right to continue to others according to the rule (which is different in the different countries. This is just a choice of words that actually have the same meaning.
A typical saffish expression is that at our intersections the robot could be red. Traffic light, stop light and we call it a robot. We normally have the brits perplexed with that one.
What i find of interest in your picture is that someone stuck a picture of what looks like a girl/child begging under the words. Asking you to give (a)way!
I do not think that any entrepreneurial lady of the night will stick her ad on a sign that everyone ignores (Ellies comment).
Great picture that solicited a lot of comment.
Ginnie Hart: I couldn't have said it better, Mr. Louis. And where did you say you teach?
Thank you Ginnie smile smile
Ginnie Hart: You, too, Zeb. smile

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