Hart & Soul

02 Mar 2007 695 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image Lady with the Lamp

Lady with the Lamp

As the undisputed founder of the nursing profession and known the world over, Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) stands here as a beacon outside the Sofitel hotel in London where we spent our weekend last week. 

Next to her on the median, appropriately, stands a Crimea statue in whose war she served.  Even though I was not in nursing per se, I lived in the nursing dorm in college (U of Michigan, USA) and have worked in the health profession much of my life. 

You Britishers can be proud of her.  The rest of the world is!



Lady with the Lamp

As the undisputed founder of the nursing profession and known the world over, Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) stands here as a beacon outside the Sofitel hotel in London where we spent our weekend last week. 

Next to her on the median, appropriately, stands a Crimea statue in whose war she served.  Even though I was not in nursing per se, I lived in the nursing dorm in college (U of Michigan, USA) and have worked in the health profession much of my life. 

You Britishers can be proud of her.  The rest of the world is!



comments (24)

are you a doctor of medicine then ginnie? nice capture. good angle and i love the silhouette of her lamp against the grey sky.
Ginnie Hart: HA! Are you kidding? I might wish, and actually, Genevieve, if I had to do it over again, I probably should have gotten my degree in Nursing instead of Linguistics. I worked in 2 hospitals (medical/surgery wing and psychiatric) as an aide and ward clerk; was a certified/licensed massage therapist for many years after my divorce, for supplemental income; worked in senior management in assisted living before I retired, having a special place in my heart for our residents with Alzheimer's (of which my mom died). But health care is in me whether it's my profession or not!

Thanks for your comment!
A very nice angle. Sepia works for this shot.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Thomas.
That's a wonderful angle. It makes a very stark portrait against the overcast sky.
Ginnie Hart: She was standing up on a pedestal high above my head, Karen, so it was easy to take it from this angle...without stepping out into the busy street and getting side-swiped by another taxi! smile
Interesting processing. Looks like something from the 19th century. Very fitting.
Ginnie Hart: Yes, Martin. I agree. Thanks for your comment.
  • dotun
  • 2 Mar 2007, 07:31
I like the perspective and tones used here, have a nice weekend,
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Dotun. You, too.
Great pic. I like the processing a lot. The angle is perfect.
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million, Dani.
  • Neil Tandy
  • Johannesburg, South Africa
  • 2 Mar 2007, 08:58
Incredibly beautiful photo Gramma Ginn. Florence Nightingale was indeed a remarkable lady and the world has a lot to thank her for. Very well done and I am glad those London cabbies managed to avoid you on this one!! Warmest wishes to you and Donica. Neil.-x-
Ginnie Hart: Thank you most kindly, Neil. Hope you have a nice, calm weekend! smile
Ok so everyone has stolen all of my lines. I'll just say in passing then that I like this ! smile
Ginnie Hart: You're a sweetheart, Johnny. Thanks.
grwat angle, very serene
Ginnie Hart: I think she'd like that word--serene--after reading about her tumultuous life. Thanks, Chantal.
  • Ruth
  • Michigan, USA
  • 2 Mar 2007, 10:34
It's a wonderful "portrait," with the important details in view: her face, her lamp, the details on her bodice, and that hand pulling up her skirt the slightest bit. I find this very touching. And I agree it's perfect in sepia.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you so much, Ruth. I found the hand lifting the skirt very touching as well. I did not know that she was called the Lady with the Lamp, which has new meaning for me now.
Nice angle. And the Sepia toning brings out the old world charm in the photo...
Ginnie Hart: Thanks a million, Kedar, for your kind comment.
  • Dudee thea
  • Purwokerto-Indonesia
  • 2 Mar 2007, 12:35
Hi Ginnie,
Very nice captured, everything works well i think and i can't give a lot of comment because the list of comment represent me hehe..
Ginnie Hart: You're very kind, Dudee. Thanks. smile
Like the angle of this shot - well captured.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Bernie.
  • Mia
  • Americana
  • 2 Mar 2007, 16:50
I admire her smile And this is probably the first statue I've seen of her. Before it was only in history books that I saw her bent over some soldier, attending to him or walking amidst the cots with a lamp.
Ginnie Hart: Now that I think of it, Mia, it may be my first statue of her as well. I was thrilled when I saw it standing outside our hotel!
  • Sola
  • 2 Mar 2007, 17:01
Very interesting perspective smile
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Sola, for taking the time to stop by and comment. That means a lot.
great great angle Ginnie!!! and nice prossessing ! have a great week end Ginnie
Ginnie Hart: You're a sweetheart, Dafredo. Thanks. You, too, have a great weekend.
  • julischka
  • Germany, near Frankfurt am Main
  • 2 Mar 2007, 19:41
These coincidences are really fun because I work in a hospital.
Great angle! Cheers!
Ginnie Hart: Seriously, Julia? What specifically do you do? I have always liked being in hospitals, either as a patient or as an employee. Health care really is in my blood to say that, right?!
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 2 Mar 2007, 21:52
In my imagination the 'night'ingale and the lamp always goes together. Great person she was. Great picture you produced here.
Ginnie Hart: You're so right, Louis--night and lamp! What a perect, fun connection (leave it to you!). Thank you kindly.
The title is so random for such a character! I LOVE the angle you chose. I'm curious on why a hotel would choose a nurse to put in the entrance....
Ginnie Hart: I was so surprised when I read Wiki, Samira, to find out that's what she was called: Lady with the Lamp! It sure makes sense, doesn't it!

I'm not sure why these statues here outside in the median of the street in front of the hotel. A block away was Nelson's Column and nearby was Trafalgar Square. So maybe they were trying to get statues everywhere they would fit?! smile
  • Ellie
  • 2 Mar 2007, 23:47
A really unusual angle Ginnie, and it works too even though she might not have approved wink

Yes, a very important lady whose work meant that a lot of lives were saved. We could do with somebody like her right now to deal with the current high level of in-hospital infections.
Ginnie Hart: You're so sweet, Ellie. Any other angle seemed pretty blah to me, so I was glad this one seemed to work.

I wasn't aware of the "current high level of in-hospital infections" and wonder if this is happening all over the world, now that antibiotics are losing their effectiveness?
Florence was a Unitarian, if I'm not mistaken. Thanks for filling us in on your career path. They always said those liberal arts degrees would so useful! My dad is a linguist and taught college for many years.
Ginnie Hart: Oh wow, Susan. Thanks for the added tidbit on Florence.

My career path really wasn't a career (unlike Donica's, for instance) but was more of a path of jobs that were right at the time. If I had had a career, it most probably would have been in the medical/health profession. But you're right: those liberal arts degrees end up being useful (or not!) just for the exercise/discipline alone, if for no other reason! smile

Thanks a million for commenting here. smile
Like very much your angle of view Ginnie smile
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Zeb.
You caught her so perfectly. The shadows, the angle, everything, Ginnie! Very well done.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, dear Kay.
The angle of the shot makes it very interesting. I like the muted quality of the background, too.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Red Pen.

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a constructive critical comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon PowerShot S3 IS
exposure mode program mode
shutterspeed 1/1000s
aperture f/4.0
sensitivity unknown
focal length 12.9mm
It's MondayIt's Monday
In Other WordsIn Other Words
A Clock of a Different ColorA Clock of a Dif...

Warning