Hart & Soul

10 Jan 2014 564 views
 
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photoblog image Boat Friday

Boat Friday

 

A gable stone from Bolsward, Netherlands, 1750.


Man: Gosse Jochems from Joure, NL
Woman: Jetske Jacobs from Bolsward, NL
Married in Joure in 1746, 25 km from Bolsward.

 

Don't you wonder how they met back then?

Passing ships in the night?

 

 

 

Boat Friday

 

A gable stone from Bolsward, Netherlands, 1750.


Man: Gosse Jochems from Joure, NL
Woman: Jetske Jacobs from Bolsward, NL
Married in Joure in 1746, 25 km from Bolsward.

 

Don't you wonder how they met back then?

Passing ships in the night?

 

 

 

comments (38)

Whole lotta ship passing goin' on....
Ginnie Hart: I'm guessing that happened a lot more than planes, trains and automobiles, Larry? grin
It's a wonderful stone sculpture and romance to boot... love it Ginnie....petersmile
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Peter. You can imagine the whole story from this little stone! smile
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 10 Jan 2014, 04:50
I think it was daylight when they met, at night it might have been to dark and would have missed each other completely.
Wonderful gevelsteen. Always fun to look for them.
Ginnie Hart: I love these gable stones, as you know, MLMA. Whenever they relate to Boat Friday, I love them even more. smile Hartstikke bedankt.
  • Focales
  • Turkey
  • 10 Jan 2014, 06:12
Très très beau ce bas-relief maritime
Ginnie Hart: You know by now, dear Marie, that many of us at Shutterchance "celebrate" Boat Friday, so when I find a gable stone with a boat, I'm quite happy to oblige. Merci. smile
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 10 Jan 2014, 06:22
A fine, original Boat Friday, Ginnie, and one that tells a story
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, Lisl. I was amazed to find all this info on the Dutch database of gable stones. It made me feel I could like a story. grin
  • Chris
  • England
  • 10 Jan 2014, 07:22
Intriguing isn't it Ginnie
Ginnie Hart: Story telling written on stone, Chris. Totally intriguing! smile
  • Elaine-
  • Canada
  • 10 Jan 2014, 07:28
ginnie girl, did you miss the 60's? lol or the 70's for the matter? 'i think it's kicking in' can only refer to acid in my mind anyway smile

that ship may have passed in the night, but it looks like it didn't, it hit a rock and was fossilized smile
Ginnie Hart: You're way too out of your mind, Elaine. grin
A beautiful rendering of the relief of the stone and detail, good topic Ginnie
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Roland.
I wonder if they have descendants around?
Ginnie Hart: Since the town is pretty small (less than 10K), Bill, it wouldn't surprise me. That'd be fun to research.
  • jpla
  • Anjou
  • 10 Jan 2014, 08:31
ça ne nous rajeunit pas... Bonne journée
JP
Ginnie Hart: Merci, JP.
  • HF
  • Germany
  • 10 Jan 2014, 08:57
I've been in Bolsward and it's a nice little town. The region is a great area for boat holidays.
Ginnie Hart: I declare. It's a small world after all! Thanks, HF.
Wonderful bit of stonemasonry
Ginnie Hart: I thought so, too, Martin. These gable stones amaze me! Thanks.
  • Gutteridge
  • Where latitude and aittitude meet
  • 10 Jan 2014, 09:13
I do like the shape of that boat Ginnie, it has something homely and reassuring about it.
Ginnie Hart: It does look sea-worthy, Chad, doesn't it! smile
  • paul
  • United Kingdom
  • 10 Jan 2014, 09:16
well spotted Ginnie
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, kind sir.
Good find Ginnie! I'm sure you are compiling a collection? smile
Ginnie Hart: Thanks, Martin, and, oh, yes. Collecting gable stones is one of my favorite things to do. smile
the love boat, Ginnie!
Ginnie Hart: Now why didn't I think of that!!!
  • Mary MacADNski
  • Beautiful Prince Edward Island, Canada
  • 10 Jan 2014, 10:13
I think the gable stone must be from 1746 too. Is that possible? It looks very old.
Ginnie Hart: The gable stone is from 1750, Mary, (it may be confusing in the text above), so they must have had it made 4 years after they were married. Awww. How sweet. smile
  • Ruth
  • United States
  • 10 Jan 2014, 11:03
The gable stone is beautiful and this makes a gorgeous image. And yes a sweet thing to imagine their meeting. I love your white background!
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, Ruth. It's always easy for me to think up stories when I see these beautiful gable stones.

And regarding the background, we have the abitlity here at SC to choose between black or white as the background for each post. I default to black but every once in awhile I enjoy the white. So thanks for noticing. smile
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 10 Jan 2014, 11:43
Perhaps Gosse Jochem is a Flying Dutchman who finally found a cosy home and a dear wife for ever- I like this gable stone and your sharp photo very much!
Ginnie Hart: HA! I like your imagination very much, Philine. smile
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 10 Jan 2014, 11:51
Gosse and Jetske (I love the Dutch namens) were 25 years old when they got married and they had four children, all baptized as Roman Catholics.
Ginnie Hart: The things we find on the internet, Philine! It's wonderful, isn't it! smile
25 km ain't that far, right?
Compare this to the distance between the US and NL?!
What's 25 km in miles anyway?
You're so European these days! wink
Ginnie Hart: Without planes, trains and automobiles...but only boats...I guess in the Netherlands nowhere is far, LC. HA! 25km is 15.5 miles. A good day's walk or a nice boat row.
What a nice print Ginnie!
Ginnie Hart: It's fun, Ronky. smile Thanks.
It looks as if this boat has weathered many a storm since 1750, Ginnie, but after all that it is still afloat. Do I see two figures embracing in the stern of the boat, or is it just my imagination?
Ginnie Hart: I think I see your two lovebirds as well, Beverly. smile
Usually a couple of ways in that age - church, or trading partners.
Ginnie Hart: HAHAHA! I bet you know a lot about this stuff, Tom. smile
That is a really interesting find Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: I just love gable stones, Brian. I "collect" them like you collect trains and churches. smile
  • george
  • Ireland
  • 10 Jan 2014, 15:22
Don't you just love the patina of the passing years. A bountiful Boat Friday to you and Astrid...along with a wonderful weekend.
Ginnie Hart: Oh, yes, George. I am such a lover of these old stones! Many kind thanks.
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 10 Jan 2014, 15:33
It has weathered the storms of time well
Ginnie Hart: So it has, Anne! Thanks.
What a wonderful stone work Ginnie! Great find.
Ginnie Hart: I'm trying to remember if I saw these gable stones in France, Richard, but I love seeing them in our neck of the woods. Merci.
Nicely taken smile
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Shane.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 10 Jan 2014, 18:39
That is a "wow", Ginnie.
Ginnie Hart: Very kind of you, Ray. I love these gable stones like you love your critters, I think. smile
  • CherryPie
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 10 Jan 2014, 20:07
A lovely stone relief.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, Cherry.
It is so cool to have building with those little pieces of art in them.
Ginnie Hart: I so agree, Michael, and lucky for me, they are everywhere in this part of Europe.
  • helys
  • France
  • 11 Jan 2014, 15:01
Awesome
Great patterns, détals
Ginnie Hart: Many thanks, Helys. Merci.
Fascinating stonework Ginnie. It's really amazing to think how far mankind has come in just over 250 years.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, John. I love the stories these gable stones tell!
Fantastic details - wonderful story! It is amazing how some people meet... smile
Ginnie Hart: HAHAHA! Spoken from one who knows...TO one who also knows! grin Thanks, Elizabeth.
I love this very much; beautiful and great historic art work.
Ginnie Hart: Thank you kindly, Sartenada. I'm a huge fan of gable stones like this. smile
  • Oscar
  • Germany
  • 13 Jan 2014, 20:30
from 1750! OMG. Good job in 1750
Ginnie Hart: I know, Oscar. It still blows my mind when I see these dates!
Love the textures!
Ginnie Hart: Thank you, Robin!

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